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Designing a Multi-Stakeholder Results Framework : A Toolkit to Guide Participatory Diagnostics and Planning for Stronger Results and Effectiveness

2013-11, World Bank Institute

This toolkit provides guidance to strengthen the results and effectiveness of multi-stakeholder development planning, including practical tools and processes. The toolkit guides collaborative steps, such as setting goals, diagnosing institutional problems and monitoring outcomes, all to produce a multi-stakeholder, outcome-based results framework to prepare a development strategy or plan and to implement with a strong result focus. It also includes guidance to use the results framework to highlight potentially high-impact areas for strengthening multi-stakeholder activities and to integrate monitoring and budget planning to a common set of outcomes. The toolkit gives special attention to the fragile context for development practitioners working in this area. The toolkit modules provide customizable resources to create a multi-stakeholder, outcome-based results framework. The modules can be used together as a complete resource or separately, focusing on modules that are of immediate interest. Although WBI originally developed the modules to support strategy design at the national level, they can also guide multi-stakeholder planning for results in other settings or key sectors where actors have diverse perspectives, with appropriate adjustments.

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Poverty Reduction with Strategic Communication: Moving from Awareness Raising to Sustained Citizen Participation

2011, Mozammel, Masud, Mozammel, Masud

The role of communication in Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS) processes has evolved since 2000. The introduction of new communication channels for public policy debate has empowered a wide array of stakeholders who previously were absent or marginal in the development agenda. Initially, consultations were mainly a donor-led requirement, often done to access Heavily Indebted Poor Country (HIPC) funding quickly. This experience led to the recognition that more can be gained by working in partnership with other stakeholders. This publication updates a 2005 review of communication in PRSs. It includes four country case studies (Ghana, Tanzania, Moldova, and Nepal) and a regional analysis of Latin America and the Caribbean. It explores how the use of strategic communication has expanded beyond the PRS and is now being integrated into national development planning and implementation. Many of these strategies are shifting their focus from a 'dissemination and publicity strategy' to a 'communication program' that emphasizes information intervention beyond the traditional campaign, workshop or seminars. Compared with the 2005 review, the main difference is the institutionalization of communication, moving beyond the one-time experience for the first set of PRSs to broader, deeper sustained communication in support of poverty reduction and national development strategies. A second major difference is expanding beyond communication and participation in PRS formulation to PRS implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. The challenges of communication in national development strategies both within and between government, civil society, and donors correspond to some of the key challenges of the PRS initiative, how to create a genuinely participatory, and comprehensive process. Donor harmonization and aid coordination have improved government-donor relations, but both parties need to forge a new relationship with civil society for the more ambitious agenda to promote good governance.

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Information Technology Security Handbook

2003, Sadowsky, George, Dempsey, James X., Greenberg, Alan, Mack, Barbara J., Schwartz, Alan

Informational and Communication Technologies (ICT) plays a fundamental role for social and economic development. Similarly, it is recognized that there cannot be an effective use of ICT in the absence of a safe and trusted ICT environment. Thus, IT security plays a prime role in helping creating the environment needed to set the ground for implementing successful national ICT plans, e-Government or e-Commerce activities, as well as sectoral projects, such as, for example, in the areas of education, health, or finance. IT security is a complex topic and evolves almost as fast as technology does. The authors provide technology-independent best practices, as well as recommendations for particular IT environments. As technology evolves, the accompanying web site (www.infodev-security.net) will provide updates as appropriate, allowing for a constant dissemination of developments in the field of IT security. The book is composed of five parts, each of which can be read independently. After an introduction to general issues of IT security, the book addresses issues relevant specifically to individuals, small and medium organizations, government, and technical administrators. Although most of the research and publications on IT security comes from developed countries, the authors have attempted to provide practical guidance applicable anywhere and to include examples from developing countries.