Country Climate and Development Reports (CCDRs)

45 items available

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The World Bank Group’s Country Climate and Development Reports (CCDRs) are a core diagnostic that integrates climate change and development. They help countries prioritize the most impactful actions that can reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and boost adaptation and resilience, while delivering on broader development goals. CCDRs build on data and rigorous research and identify main pathways to reduce GHG emissions and climate vulnerabilities, including the costs and challenges as well as benefits and opportunities from doing so. The reports suggest concrete, priority actions to support the low-carbon, resilient transition. As public documents, CCDRs aim to inform governments, citizens, the private sector and development partners and enable engagements with the development and climate agenda. CCDRs feed into other core Bank Group diagnostics, country engagements and operations, and help attract funding and direct financing for high-impact climate action.

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  • Publication
    Liberia Country Climate Development Report
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2024-03-21) World Bank Group
    This Country Climate and Development Report (CCDR) examines Liberia’s development trajectory through the lens of the country’s vulnerability to climate change. It identifies Liberia’s development risks and opportunities, models various scenarios of climate impact and intervention, and proposes ways to strengthen resilience and finance climate actions that support Liberia’s development aspirations of inclusive growth and poverty reduction.
  • Publication
    Lebanon Country Climate and Development Report
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2024-03-07) World Bank Group
    The Lebanon Country Climate and Development Report (CCDR) aligns the country’s short-term recovery needs with resilient, low-carbon, long-term development, building on quantitative modeling-based analytics, existing research and country diagnostics, and extensive stakeholder consultations to study the effects of climate change on Lebanon’s recovery and development objectives.
  • Publication
    Zimbabwe Country Climate and Development Report
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2024-02-29) World Bank Group
    Zimbabwe is a lower middle-income country with abundant natural capital and growth potential, but is highly exposed to climate change, with its immediate ability to address climate challenges severely constrained. People in Zimbabwe are increasingly reliant on successive rounds of emergency relief rather than a formal government safety net. Macroeconomic constraints, deindustrialization, and land reform have combined to increase dependency on agricultural livelihoods and push up emissions from land use change. The macroeconomic constraints pose a double bind in which the inability to finance development, climate adaptation, and mitigation is leading to increased land degradation, higher net emissions, and less resilience. This Country Climate and Development Report (CCDR) identifies a path out of this double bind by linking demand from global green value chains to Zimbabwe’s significant reserves of energy transition minerals (ETMs), such as lithium needed for electric vehicles, in a way that: (i) enables public and private sectors to invest in resilient low-carbon development; (ii) finances capital accumulation that could be deployed to support at-scale land restoration and increases agricultural productivity; and (iii) expands resilience-building social safety nets to protect the most vulnerable, helping them adapt to the expected increase in cyclical weather shocks.
  • Publication
    Ethiopia Country Climate and Development Report, February 2024
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2024-02-27) World Bank Group
    The Ethiopia Country Climate and Development Report (CCDR) aims to support Ethiopia’s plans to achieve its development goals within the context of a changing climate. By quantifying the likely economic impacts of climate change on the economy between now and 2050, the report highlights the measures that the government of Ethiopia (GoE) needs to prioritize to prepare for these impacts and adapt to them most effectively, with a particular focus on actions that should be taken throughout the remainder of this decade. Opportunities for low-carbon growth as a co-benefit of development programs are also examined.
  • Publication
    MENA Country Climate and Development Report: Climate Change Action in the Middle East and North Africa — Key Insights from Country Climate and Development Reports
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2023-12-05) World Bank Group
    Climate action is critical for development in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The region contains countries among the most affected by climate change but least prepared to address it. This report introduces key findings of the World Bank Country Climate and Development Reports (CCDRs) in the region. The CCDRs help align climate and development considerations for governments and other stakeholders and help prioritize actions that enhance adaptation and resilience, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and align with broader development goals. Addressing these challenges and converting them into opportunities is crucial, including taking carefully prioritized, sustained action. Seven CCDRs have been published for MENA countries (Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon1, Morocco, Tunisia, West Bank and Gaza), offering policy and investment options to harmonize climate and development objectives. Additional countries will be covered as CCDRs are finalized in the coming years
  • Publication
    Benin Country Climate and Development Report
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2023-12-05) World Bank Group
    This Country Climate and Development Report (CCDR) proposes that Benin focuses on building a resilient economy, with investment and policy options primarily targeted at adapting to climate change risks. The dependence of Benin’s economic structure on agriculture and informal employment makes its development path highly vulnerable to climate change in the absence of proper adaptation. The government and the private sector need to be better prepared to deal with climate change – building adequate institutions and governance structures will be crucial. While all sectors will have to become more resilient, this is especially urgent for agriculture and land use, urban and network infrastructure, and human development (education, health). Mitigation efforts should focus on avoiding carbon lock-ins and reducing deforestation. Investing in renewable energy whilst expanding the population’s access to electricity should be a priority for Benin. A higher share of renewable energy can bring about co-benefits for other sectors (agriculture, water, transport, and forestry). To maintain its growth trajectory, Benin needs to pay special attention to its most vulnerable people, including women. To protect the poor and vulnerable the just transition should focus on reconciling development and climate goals while addressing inequality (income and gender related), and spatial exclusion.
  • Publication
    The Development, Climate, and Nature Crisis : Solutions to End Poverty on a Livable Planet - Insights from World Bank Country Climate and Development Reports covering 42 economies
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2023-12-01) World Bank Group
    The world faces a triple crisis of three interconnected issues―development, climate, and nature― and current levels of climate action are insufficient. Beyond the grim headlines, there are increasingly clear opportunities to achieve triple wins. To support the alignment of sustainable development priorities and actions with climate change risks and objectives, the World Bank launched the Country Climate and Development Report (CCDR) in 2022. This core diagnostic tool aims to help countries prioritize the most impactful actions to boost resilience and adaptation and reduce GHG emissions, while delivering on broader development and sustainability objectives. CCDRs now cover 56 percent of the population of low- and middle-income countries (LICs and MICs) and 73 percent of their gross domestic product (GDP). The second set of CCDRs also includes one high-income country (HIC), Romania. A main addition of the CCDRs published since COP27 relates to tropical forests, a key dimension of the global climate change challenge. The first set of CCDRs covered only 10 percent of the world’s tropical forests, but the addition of key forested countries―including Brazil, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, and the Republic of Congo―increases coverage to 56 percent. Many CCDRs (including Romania and Türkiye) also discuss the role of non-tropical forests for resilience and emission reduction. This second summary report builds on the first report published ahead of COP27. Although it is important to caveat the differences in scenarios and ambition, modeling framework, and scope of analysis, this report provides aggregated results that can help governments, private sector investors, citizens, and development partners prioritize the most impactful climate actions. It confirms―with more granularity and stronger evidence, based on more countries―key findings from the first summary report; but it also discusses new issues, such as deforestation and land degradation. It aims to inform global priorities, including the World Bank’s Evolution Roadmap and Global Challenge Programs (GCP), as well as other global initiatives.
  • Publication
    West Bank and Gaza Country Climate and Development Report
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2023-11-30) World Bank Group
    This Country Climate and Development Report (CCDR) for the West Bank and Gaza examines the social and macroeconomic impacts of climate change under three alternative scenarios that reflect different levels of climate action and divergent economic growth trajectories. The scenario analysis builds on sector-level assessments focused on the water-energy-food nexus, urban development, and the macroeconomic framework and is informed by extensive stakeholder consultations and the stated climate priorities of the Palestinian Authority (PA). The health and social-protection sectors are treated as cross-cutting factors in this analysis, reflecting the critical importance of service provision and human capital in a fragile context like the West Bank and Gaza.
  • Publication
    Dominican Republic Country Climate and Development Report
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2023-11-30) World Bank Group
    The Dominican Republic has made significant progress in boosting economic growth and reducing poverty, but it still faces challenges to achieve inclusive and equitable development, increase productivity, and improve the competitiveness and sustainability of primary sectors like agriculture, water, tourism, and energy. The National Development Strategy (NDS) and the National Multi‑Year Public Sector Plan (NPSP) aim to address development and climate challenges and promote a green, inclusive and resilient future. The DR is highly vulnerable to climate change, which is likely to compound existing development challenges. By 2050, climate change impacts are expected to decrease labor productivity and affect health, crop yields, tourism, infrastructure capital, and natural ecosystems such as forests and coastal areas. Climate change also poses risks to the financial system such as the banking sector's heightened credit exposure to tropical cyclones and droughts. Although the DR has a small carbon footprint, the country's GHG emissions have been rising, mainly in the energy, waste, and agricultural sectors. Fostering a low‑carbon growth path can support the country's climate change goals while bringing important development co‑benefits. The Dominican Republic CCDR employs a version of the MANAGE model. This CCDR further extends the model to incorporate the path of emissions from key sectors (transport, energy, AFOLU), and to incorporate DR‑specific climate damage functions to introduce the impact of climate change on the economy.
  • Publication
    Tunisia Country Climate and Development Report
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2023-11-29) World Bank Group
    This Climate Change and Development Report (CCDR) establishes the case for a new economic model to address Tunisia’s challenging economic and social context and vulnerability to climate change. Building on extensive analyses and consultations (see Box 1 for our approach), the CCDR calls for a new model that emphasizes the role of the private sector in generating most jobs, while the state focuses on its regulating function, funding expenditures with the highest social and economic returns, and directing resources to interventions that are both economically and environmentally sustainable. The proposed model would involve major changes, such as using pricing to rationalize the consumption of resources and creating economic conditions that support private investments in climate adaptation and decarbonization. It would also involve a shift from recurrent public expenditures to public investments in adaptation and decarbonization.