Other Financial Accountability Study

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  • Publication
    Supreme Audit Institutions’ Use of Information Technology Globally for More Efficient and Effective Audits
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-10-18) World Bank
    Supreme audit institutions (SAIs) recognize the benefits of using technology to improve the quality and impact of their audits. This benefit has further intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic; SAIs with existing technology capacity have continued to perform their role effectively and efficiently. The paper explores how at a global level SAIs are using technology to perform more efficient and more effective audits. It provides a brief overview of how some SAIs are harnessing the possibilities created by advances in technology to develop new, innovative audit methods and procedures. It also seeks to identify the factors inhibiting other SAIs in particular SAIs in developing countries from implementing and using audit methods based on information technology (IT). Against this background, the paper suggests ways in which the World Bank, working with other stakeholders, can facilitate the more extensive and more effective use of IT-based tools and methods by SAIs. The impact of COVID-19 has introduced a new important consideration: namely, how IT has helped some SAIs respond with agility and resilience to the unprecedented and completely unforeseen circumstances created by the pandemic.
  • Publication
    South Africa Financial Ombud System Diagnostic
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-06-10) World Bank
    The Finance, Competitiveness and Innovation Global Practice of the World Bank Group (WBG) aims to help countries build financial systems that are deep, diversified, inclusive, efficient, and stable essential to promoting economic growth, reducing poverty, and increasing shared prosperity. One core activity is supporting national authorities to achieve their objectives for financial inclusion, by supporting policy, legal, regulatory, and supervisory reforms in areas such as financial consumer protection, including financial-sector alternative dispute resolution (ADR). Through the South Africa Financial Sector Development and Reform Program, the WBG is supporting the national reform process, which includes achieving an efficient and effective ADR system, so that financial customers can hold financial institutions to account if there is a dispute. This diagnostic review valuates the current financial-sector Ombud system in South Africa, Compares it against international good practice, and recommends reforms to provide good-quality outcomes and good value for money for the future.
  • Publication
    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of Kakamega County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The subnational Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment seeks to ascertain the performance of the public financial management (PFM) system of county governments using the PEFA methodology. So far, the Government of Kenya has gained experience in the application of the PEFA methodology by undertaking four national PEFA assessments over the years, the latest of which was carried out in 2017 and the report is due for completion in 2018. However, this is the first subnational assessment to be carried out in Kenya following the adoption of a devolved system of government. It is notable that the national and subnational PEFA assessments are being done almost concurrently, and this is important because both levels of government share the same PFM system, implying that an evidence- based reform agenda can be implemented simultaneously after areas of improvements are identified. The subnational assessments, which covered 6 out of 45 counties, have been jointly financed by the World Bank and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) through the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).
  • Publication
    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of West Pokot County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The rationale for the public expenditure and financial accountability (PEFA) assessment is to provide a clear and deeper understanding about the functioning of public financial management (PFM) systems as well as the organizational aspects of existing institutions at county levels. The results of the analysis provide useful insights into relevant entry points for desired PFM-related reforms and a benchmark for the necessary upgrade of the PFM systems which are still in the early stages of development within Kenya’s devolved units of government. This assessment was organized and commissioned by Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA) in collaboration with the World Bank and involves other organizations. KIPPRA also carried out the actual survey and assessment and was responsible for management and monitoring of the exercise. The assessment period covers three financial years, namely FY2013-14, FY2014-15, and FY2015-16, and focused on various indicators and dimensions as defined in the PEFA assessment tools.
  • Publication
    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of Nakuru County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The subnational Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment seeks to ascertain the performance of the public financial management (PFM) system of county governments using the PEFA methodology. So far, the Government of Kenya has gained experience in the application of the PEFA methodology by undertaking four national PEFA assessments over the years, the latest carried out in 2017 and the report due for completion in 2018. However, this is the first subnational assessment to be carried out in Kenya following the adoption of a devolved system of government. It is notable that the national and subnational PEFA assessments are almost being done concurrently and this is important because both levels of government share the same PFM system implying that an evidence-based reform agenda can be implemented simultaneously after areas that require improvements are identified. The subnational assessments, which covered 6 out of 47 counties, have been jointly financed by the World Bank and International Development Research Centre (IDRC) through the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).
  • Publication
    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of Kajiado County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The subnational Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment seeks to ascertain the performance of the public financial management (PFM) system of county governments using the PEFA methodology. So far, the Government of Kenya has gained experience in the application of the PEFA methodology by undertaking four national PEFA assessments over the years, the latest of which was carried out in 2017 and the report is due for completion in 2018. However, this is the first subnational assessment to be carried out in Kenya following the adoption of a devolved system of government. It is notable that the national and subnational PEFA assessments are being almost done concurrently, and this is important because both levels of government share the same PFM system, implying that evidence-based reform agenda can be implemented simultaneously after areas of improvements are identified. The subnational assessments, which covered 6 out of 47 counties, have been jointly financed by the World Bank and International Development Research Centre (IDRC) through the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).
  • Publication
    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of Makueni County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The subnational Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment seeks to ascertain the performance of the public financial management (PFM) system of county governments using the PEFA methodology. So far, the Government of Kenya has gained experience in the application of the PEFA methodology by undertaking four national PEFA assessments over the years, the latest of which was carried out in 2017 and the report is due for completion in 2018. However, this is the first subnational assessment to be carried out in Kenya following the adoption of a devolved system of government. It is notable that the national and subnational PEFA assessments are being done almost concurrently, and this is important because both levels of government share the same PFM system, implying that evidence-based reform agenda can be implemented simultaneously after areas of improvements are identified. The subnational assessments, which covered 6 out of 47 counties, have been jointly financed by the World Bank and International Development Research Centre (IDRC) through the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).
  • Publication
    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of Baringo County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The subnational Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment seeks to ascertain the performance of the PFM system of county governments using the PEFA methodology. So far, the Government of Kenya has gained experience in the application of the PEFA methodology by undertaking four national PEFA assessments over the years, the latest of which was carried out in 2017 and the report is due for completion in 2018. However, this is the first subnational assessment to be carried out in Kenya following the adoption of a devolved system of government. It is notable that the national and subnational PEFA assessments are being done almost concurrently, and this is important because both levels of government share the same public finance management (PFM) system, implying that evidence-based reform agenda can be implemented simultaneously after areas of improvements are identified. The subnational assessments, which covered 6 out of 47 counties, have been jointly financed by the World Bank and International Development Research Centre (IDRC) through the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).
  • Publication
    Improving Transparency and Accountability in Public-Private Partnerships: Disclosure Diagnostic Report - Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-05) World Bank
    Based on research and analysis over the past few years, the World Bank Group Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) Cross-Cutting Solution Area has worked on creating a Framework for Disclosure in Public-Private Partnerships, which suggests a systematic structure for disclosing information proactively at different phases of the PPP process. Two documents, Jurisdictional Studies and Good Practice Cases, have been developed to provide relevant background and resources complementing the goals of the framework. The framework suggests the initiation of work with a PPP Disclosure Diagnostic in countries. The objective of the Diagnostic is to help PPP policy makers and practitioners to assess the status of PPP disclosure in the jurisdiction and identify customized PPP disclosure solutions for all PPP types to enable better disclosure. Under each of the areas identified, the Diagnostic provides the key questions policy makers and practitioners should ask, analysis and techniques for assessing gaps, resources for learning more, and tools for establishing customized PPP disclosure guidelines for the jurisdiction. The relevance of each of the above areas varies based on the unique circumstances within the country. This diagnostic report is structured around the key themes that are relevant to Kenya’s disclosure environment.
  • Publication
    Enhancing Financial Capability and Inclusion in Zambia: A Demand-Side Assessment
    (World Bank, Zambia, 2017-11) World Bank Group
    Financial inclusion in Zambia has nearly doubled in the last ten years - from 21.3 percent in 2005 to 40.2 percent in 2016. This success was made possible by Zambia’s Financial Sector Development Plan that concluded in 2015. And yet, when compared to other lower-middle income countries, Zambia fares less favorably in terms of account ownership, accessibility of bank branches, and usage of financial services. Main cited barriers are lack of funds, high fees, time-consuming travel, and lack of trust in the financial sector. Zambia aims to achieve universal access and has committed to implementing comprehensive national strategies for financial inclusion and financial education to accelerate progress. The World Bank survey covered in this report was requested by Zambian authorities to inform their further strategy work, help formulate quantifiable and concrete targets, and assess the effectiveness of future financial capability enhancing programs. The key findings and recommendations of the report cover areas related to Financial Inclusion, Financial Capability, and Financial Consumer Protection, followed by four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the financial inclusion landscape in Zambia. Chapter 2 reviews financial capability of Zambians in terms of their financial knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Chapter 3 analyzes the link between financial inclusion and financial capability in Zambia, and Chapter 4 assesses whether the financial products in Zambia meet consumers’ needs.