Other Financial Accountability Study

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    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of Kajiado County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The subnational Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment seeks to ascertain the performance of the public financial management (PFM) system of county governments using the PEFA methodology. So far, the Government of Kenya has gained experience in the application of the PEFA methodology by undertaking four national PEFA assessments over the years, the latest of which was carried out in 2017 and the report is due for completion in 2018. However, this is the first subnational assessment to be carried out in Kenya following the adoption of a devolved system of government. It is notable that the national and subnational PEFA assessments are being almost done concurrently, and this is important because both levels of government share the same PFM system, implying that evidence-based reform agenda can be implemented simultaneously after areas of improvements are identified. The subnational assessments, which covered 6 out of 47 counties, have been jointly financed by the World Bank and International Development Research Centre (IDRC) through the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).
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    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of Kakamega County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The subnational Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment seeks to ascertain the performance of the public financial management (PFM) system of county governments using the PEFA methodology. So far, the Government of Kenya has gained experience in the application of the PEFA methodology by undertaking four national PEFA assessments over the years, the latest of which was carried out in 2017 and the report is due for completion in 2018. However, this is the first subnational assessment to be carried out in Kenya following the adoption of a devolved system of government. It is notable that the national and subnational PEFA assessments are being done almost concurrently, and this is important because both levels of government share the same PFM system, implying that an evidence- based reform agenda can be implemented simultaneously after areas of improvements are identified. The subnational assessments, which covered 6 out of 45 counties, have been jointly financed by the World Bank and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) through the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).
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    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of Nakuru County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The subnational Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment seeks to ascertain the performance of the public financial management (PFM) system of county governments using the PEFA methodology. So far, the Government of Kenya has gained experience in the application of the PEFA methodology by undertaking four national PEFA assessments over the years, the latest carried out in 2017 and the report due for completion in 2018. However, this is the first subnational assessment to be carried out in Kenya following the adoption of a devolved system of government. It is notable that the national and subnational PEFA assessments are almost being done concurrently and this is important because both levels of government share the same PFM system implying that an evidence-based reform agenda can be implemented simultaneously after areas that require improvements are identified. The subnational assessments, which covered 6 out of 47 counties, have been jointly financed by the World Bank and International Development Research Centre (IDRC) through the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).
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    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of Makueni County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The subnational Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment seeks to ascertain the performance of the public financial management (PFM) system of county governments using the PEFA methodology. So far, the Government of Kenya has gained experience in the application of the PEFA methodology by undertaking four national PEFA assessments over the years, the latest of which was carried out in 2017 and the report is due for completion in 2018. However, this is the first subnational assessment to be carried out in Kenya following the adoption of a devolved system of government. It is notable that the national and subnational PEFA assessments are being done almost concurrently, and this is important because both levels of government share the same PFM system, implying that evidence-based reform agenda can be implemented simultaneously after areas of improvements are identified. The subnational assessments, which covered 6 out of 47 counties, have been jointly financed by the World Bank and International Development Research Centre (IDRC) through the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).
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    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of West Pokot County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The rationale for the public expenditure and financial accountability (PEFA) assessment is to provide a clear and deeper understanding about the functioning of public financial management (PFM) systems as well as the organizational aspects of existing institutions at county levels. The results of the analysis provide useful insights into relevant entry points for desired PFM-related reforms and a benchmark for the necessary upgrade of the PFM systems which are still in the early stages of development within Kenya’s devolved units of government. This assessment was organized and commissioned by Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA) in collaboration with the World Bank and involves other organizations. KIPPRA also carried out the actual survey and assessment and was responsible for management and monitoring of the exercise. The assessment period covers three financial years, namely FY2013-14, FY2014-15, and FY2015-16, and focused on various indicators and dimensions as defined in the PEFA assessment tools.
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    Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Assessment of Baringo County, Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-11) World Bank
    The subnational Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment seeks to ascertain the performance of the PFM system of county governments using the PEFA methodology. So far, the Government of Kenya has gained experience in the application of the PEFA methodology by undertaking four national PEFA assessments over the years, the latest of which was carried out in 2017 and the report is due for completion in 2018. However, this is the first subnational assessment to be carried out in Kenya following the adoption of a devolved system of government. It is notable that the national and subnational PEFA assessments are being done almost concurrently, and this is important because both levels of government share the same public finance management (PFM) system, implying that evidence-based reform agenda can be implemented simultaneously after areas of improvements are identified. The subnational assessments, which covered 6 out of 47 counties, have been jointly financed by the World Bank and International Development Research Centre (IDRC) through the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).
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    Improving Transparency and Accountability in Public-Private Partnerships: Disclosure Diagnostic Report - Kenya
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-05) World Bank
    Based on research and analysis over the past few years, the World Bank Group Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) Cross-Cutting Solution Area has worked on creating a Framework for Disclosure in Public-Private Partnerships, which suggests a systematic structure for disclosing information proactively at different phases of the PPP process. Two documents, Jurisdictional Studies and Good Practice Cases, have been developed to provide relevant background and resources complementing the goals of the framework. The framework suggests the initiation of work with a PPP Disclosure Diagnostic in countries. The objective of the Diagnostic is to help PPP policy makers and practitioners to assess the status of PPP disclosure in the jurisdiction and identify customized PPP disclosure solutions for all PPP types to enable better disclosure. Under each of the areas identified, the Diagnostic provides the key questions policy makers and practitioners should ask, analysis and techniques for assessing gaps, resources for learning more, and tools for establishing customized PPP disclosure guidelines for the jurisdiction. The relevance of each of the above areas varies based on the unique circumstances within the country. This diagnostic report is structured around the key themes that are relevant to Kenya’s disclosure environment.
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    Inclusive and Effective Citizen Engagement: Participatory Budgeting--Makueni and West Pokot Counties
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2017-05-01) World Bank Group
    The introduction of citizen engagement into law is an idea that is gaining popularity around the world. New provisions in Kenya’s Constitution enshrine openness, accountability, and public participation as guiding principles for public financial management. Yet, translating participation laws into meaningful action on the ground is no simple task. With support from the Kenya participatory budgeting initiative (KPBI), and the commitment from West Pokot and Makueni County leaders, PB is being tested as a way to achieve more inclusive and effective citizen engagement processes while complying with national legal provisions. This report describes the PB approach being adopted by Makueni and West Pokot counties. It seeks to provide detailed information on the step by step process that the two Counties have adopted and describes the support provided by the KPBI. At the national level, the report is mostly targeted towards PB practitioners and county officials interested in introducing PB as part of their budgeting cycle. The report seeks also to inform a wider audience of PB and citizen engagement practitioners on the Kenyan experience to date.
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    Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia Diagnostic Review of Financial Consumer Protection
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2017-04) World Bank Group
    The objective of the Diagnostic Review of Financial Consumer Protection in Ethiopia is to assess the legal, regulatory, and institutional framework for financial consumer protection (FCP) and develop prioritized and tailored recommendations aimed at supporting the National Bank of Ethiopia (NBE) in developing and operationalizing improvements to that framework. The assessment is conducted under the Ethiopia Financial Inclusion Support Framework (FISF) Program, and based on the revised and enhanced 2017 Edition of the World Bank Good Practices for Financial Consumer Protection with focus on retail products and services in four sectors: i) banks and non-bank financial institutions (NBFIs); ii) payments; and iii) insurance. Further, the review covers five topics in each of the above-mentioned sectors: i) legal, regulatory, and supervisory framework; ii) disclosure and sales practices; iii) fair treatment and business conduct; iv) data privacy; and v) dispute resolution mechanisms. The report reflects the existing legal, regulatory, and institutional framework in Ethiopia, with references to planned reforms that were presented to or discussed with the World Bank team. It also features industry practices identified through interviews with financial services providers, financial regulators, and consumer and industry associations.
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    Tanzania Diagnostic Review of Consumer Protection and Financial Literacy: Volume 2. Comparison with Good Practices
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2013-11) World Bank Group
    In 2011, only 17.3 percemt of adults in Tanzania had an account at a formal financial institution and 56 percemt did not have any access to financial services. Most of the population lives in rural areas with very low incomes and poor infrastructure, and women are especially disadvantaged. Such limited access to formal financial services also inhibits financial literacy – awareness of benefits and risks, and how to take advantage of opportunities. Despite significant challenges, all institutional elements of the formal financial sector in Tanzania are in place, helping its gradual expansion, and in some segments technology is driving rapid growth – particularly in mobile and electronic payments. Still, gaps and weaknesses in financial consumer protection and financial education remain some of the main obstacles to sustainability and greater trust in the financial sector. This Diagnostic Review was requested by the Ministry of Finance of Tanzania in November 2012. It provides a detailed assessment of Tanzania’s institutional, legal and regulatory framework against the World Bank’s Good Practices for Financial Consumer Protection. Three segments of the financial sector have been analyzed: banking, microfinance, and pensions. Insurance and securities segments will be considered at a later stage. Volume I of the Review summarizes the key findings and recommendations and Volume II presents a detailed assessment of each financial segment compared to the Good Practices.