Other Financial Accountability Study

150 items available

Permanent URI for this collection

Items in this collection

Now showing 1 - 4 of 4
  • Publication
    Inclusive and Effective Citizen Engagement: Participatory Budgeting--Makueni and West Pokot Counties
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2017-05-01) World Bank Group
    The introduction of citizen engagement into law is an idea that is gaining popularity around the world. New provisions in Kenya’s Constitution enshrine openness, accountability, and public participation as guiding principles for public financial management. Yet, translating participation laws into meaningful action on the ground is no simple task. With support from the Kenya participatory budgeting initiative (KPBI), and the commitment from West Pokot and Makueni County leaders, PB is being tested as a way to achieve more inclusive and effective citizen engagement processes while complying with national legal provisions. This report describes the PB approach being adopted by Makueni and West Pokot counties. It seeks to provide detailed information on the step by step process that the two Counties have adopted and describes the support provided by the KPBI. At the national level, the report is mostly targeted towards PB practitioners and county officials interested in introducing PB as part of their budgeting cycle. The report seeks also to inform a wider audience of PB and citizen engagement practitioners on the Kenyan experience to date.
  • Publication
    Rwanda Diagnostic Review of Consumer Protection and Financial Literacy: Volume 2. Comparison with Good Practices
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2013-11) World Bank
    Although the Parliament of Rwanda has passed an impressive array of financial sector laws since 2008, the laws relevant to financial consumer protection are very limited and in some cases overlapping. Consumer protection in Rwandan banking, microfinance, and insurance sectors is fragmented because of insufficiently defined roles and responsibilities among institutions and unclear enforcement capacity. While there are some strong provisions in some areas such as electronic money transfer, electronic transmission, credit information, and market conduct regulation in the insurance industry, many other areas are lagging. Rwandan authorities recognize that a sound financial consumer protection framework is fundamental to improving usage and quality of financial services, access to them, and overall deepening of the financial sector. This World Bank diagnostic review was requested by the National Bank of Rwanda (BNR) in November 2012. Modules on banking and microfinance sectors were developed based on publicly available information and data during the World Bank mission in Rwanda, and the review of the insurance sector was conducted through a desk review using the data obtained from BNR data requests and questionnaires, and the analysis is therefore constrained by it. Volume I of the review summarizes its key findings and recommendations, and volume II provides a detailed assessment against the World Bank’s good practices on financial consumer protection.
  • Publication
    Tanzania Diagnostic Review of Consumer Protection and Financial Literacy: Volume 2. Comparison with Good Practices
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2013-11) World Bank Group
    In 2011, only 17.3 percemt of adults in Tanzania had an account at a formal financial institution and 56 percemt did not have any access to financial services. Most of the population lives in rural areas with very low incomes and poor infrastructure, and women are especially disadvantaged. Such limited access to formal financial services also inhibits financial literacy – awareness of benefits and risks, and how to take advantage of opportunities. Despite significant challenges, all institutional elements of the formal financial sector in Tanzania are in place, helping its gradual expansion, and in some segments technology is driving rapid growth – particularly in mobile and electronic payments. Still, gaps and weaknesses in financial consumer protection and financial education remain some of the main obstacles to sustainability and greater trust in the financial sector. This Diagnostic Review was requested by the Ministry of Finance of Tanzania in November 2012. It provides a detailed assessment of Tanzania’s institutional, legal and regulatory framework against the World Bank’s Good Practices for Financial Consumer Protection. Three segments of the financial sector have been analyzed: banking, microfinance, and pensions. Insurance and securities segments will be considered at a later stage. Volume I of the Review summarizes the key findings and recommendations and Volume II presents a detailed assessment of each financial segment compared to the Good Practices.
  • Publication
    Republic of Zambia Diagnostic Review of Consumer Protection and Financial Literacy: Volume 2. Comparison with Good Practices
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2012-10) World Bank
    The Diagnostic Review of Consumer Protection and Financial Literacy in Zambia was conducted at the request of the Bank of Zambia (BoZ) and covered: i) banking; ii) non-bank financial institutions; iii) insurance; iv) pensions; and v) securities. The objectives of the Review were to compare the existing legal and regulatory framework, institutional arrangements, and market practices to good practices and provide recommendations to enhance financial consumer protection and financial literacy in Zambia. The Review consists of two Volumes. Volume I summarizes the key findings and recommendations and Volume II presents a detailed assessment of each of the covered sectors compared to the Good Practices.