Social Safety Nets Primer

28 items available

Permanent URI for this collection

This series is intended to provide a practical resource for those engaged in the design and implementation of safety net programs around the world. Readers will find information on good practices for a variety of types of interventions, country contexts, themes and target groups, as well as current thinking on the role of social safety nets in the broader development agenda.

Items in this collection

Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Safety Nets in Transition Economies
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2003-01) del Ninno, Carlo
    Transition economies are commonly understood to be countries that have moved or are moving from a primarily state-planned to a market-based economic system with private ownership of assets and market-supporting institutions. These countries include those of the former Soviet Union, those of Eastern and Central Europe closely allied with the Soviet Union and those in Asia and Africa recently undergoing market transformations of various degrees, such as China, Mongolia and Vietnam.
  • Publication
    Price and Tax Subsidies : Effectiveness and Challenges
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2003-01) Mackintosh, Fiona; del Ninno, Carlo
    Many governments use price and tax subsidization to meet social protection objectives. They endeavor to reduce the cost of living for their population-or for a subset of the population-by subsidizing the price of goods or services in lieu of, or in addition to, direct income transfers. While these subsidies may distort production incentives, subsidize the non-poor more than the poor, and limit consumer choice, there are reasons why a government may choose to use some forms of pricing policy rather than make income transfers to help the poor.
  • Publication
    Public Attitudes Matter : Political Economy in the Design of Safety Nets Policies
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2003-01) Blomquist, John
    It has long been recognized that political economy influences the design, implementation and outcome of safety nets, as well as other social programs, but there is no consensus about how to account for such concerns in policy decisions. This note draws on international public opinion surveys and other research to highlight some of the implications for the design of safety net policies.