Africa Region Findings & Good Practice Infobriefs

415 items available

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These briefs report on ongoing operational, economic, and sector work carried out by the World Bank and its member governments in the Africa Region.

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Multi-Dimensional Results Measurement in CDD Projects : Experiences from the Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda Social Action Funds

2007-12, Pidatala, Krishna, Lenneiye, Nginya Mungai

In the last decade, Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda have used the Community-Driven Development (CDD) approach to implement projects that exhibit multi-sectoral linkages, complex institutional structures and implementation processes, creative tension between the supply and demand sides, and convergence at the Local Government Authority (LGA) level in environments compounded by the pace of decentralization. The projects have broadened the issue of results focus from the measurement of a few input-output indicators to include intermediate outcomes (which measure beneficiaries potentially reached by outputs produced by the projects). In the process, these projects have been able to scale up from 'isolated boutique-type projects' to a mass production of outputs through participatory decision-making, local capacity development, and community control of resources. At the national level, the projects have contributed to: (a) poverty reduction, (b) improved social welfare, and (c) improved transparency and accountability.

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Tanzania - River Basin Management and Smallholder Irrigation Project

2006-11, Mohan, P.C.

Tanzania's ability to manage scarce water resources became a national issue in the early to mid-1990s. New opportunities in agriculture, and the greater demand for water for irrigation and hydropower, together with the long dry season and several years of less-than-average rainfall, contributed to water scarcity and conflicts, while the lack of information on water quantity and quality, and an inadequate framework for tackling cross-sectoral water issues severely constrained sustainable water resource management. Tanzania has defined nine river basins for water resources administration. The project components included River Basin Management, and Smallholder Irrigation Improvement and this paper examines impact on the ground and lessons learned from the project.

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Social Marketing of Bednets in Tanzania

2005-12, Nathan, Rose, Mponda, Hadji, Mshinda, Hassan

Malaria is still a devastating disease in sub Saharan Africa where it kills at least one million people every year (United Nations Children's Fund, or UNICEF 2003). Children are most vulnerable to malaria attacks, which kill more than 3,000 children every day, largely in Africa. At least 100 Tanzanian children die daily because of the disease. Another high-risk group is pregnant women. However, all other adults are also exposed to substantial risk of malaria. In Tanzania, control and care of malaria puts a huge burden on financial and economic costs both at micro and macro levels, thus translating into enormous poverty implications. As such, malaria has a potential in slowing down the achievement of the millennium development goals (MDGs) in countries where it is endemic as is the case in many parts of Tanzania.

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Microfinance Regulation : Lessons from Benin, Ghana and Tanzania

2004-10, Steel, William F.

This article identifies key issues and lessons about how the overall regulatory framework affects the ability of microfinance institutions (MFIs) to become more market-oriented and integrated with the financial system. It is based on a review undertaken by the World Bank of microfinance regulation in Benin, Ghana and Tanzania to better inform advice and project design regarding the appropriate balance between the objectives of promotion, performance, and prudential supervision.

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The Tanzania Second Social Action Fund (TASAF II) : Knowledge Sharing and Learning for Better Delivery of Results

2007-11, Ida , Manjalo

This report is currently implementing the second phase of the Tanzania Social Action Fund, known as TASAF II. The main objective of TASAF II is to empower communities to access opportunities so that they can request, implement, and monitor sub-projects that contribute to improved livelihoods that are linked to indicator targets of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as stipulated in the National Strategy for Growth and Reduction of Poverty, popularly known by its Kiswahili acronym MKUKUTA. One major challenge of delivering TASAF II is its expanded mandate and full mainstreaming into local government authorities (LGA) operations. LGAs had to be provided with the opportunity to internalize an objective assessment achievements and challenges observed during the implementation of TASAF I, through the sub-project cycle. This would provide opportunity for the joining LGAs to learn from the experiences of TASAF I, thus create space and environment for efficient and cost-effective delivery of TASAF II.

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The Tanzania Social Action Fund (TASAF) : Owning the Process of Measuring Impact and Achieving Results

2006-07, Lenneiye, N.M.

The Tanzania Social Action Fund (TASAF) is now in its second phase, covering the period 2005-2009. It is focused on giving more voice to citizens at both community and lowest local government levels - village councils. While retaining direct community financing as a key empowering mechanism, it is being implemented through Local Government Authorities. Target beneficiaries are: i) communities with inadequate access to social services; ii) households with able-bodied adults suffering from food insecurity; and iii) individuals living in poor households affected by acute shocks (like HIV/AIDS). These three beneficiary groups will access resources from a National Village Fund using procedures that build on the lessons learned regarding accountability, incomes poverty, and improving impact links.

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Reform Experience with the Tanzanian Cotton Sector

2005-06, Baffes, John

Cotton, Tanzania's second largest crop after coffee, was introduced at the turn of the century by German settlers as a plantation crop but later efforts focused on smallholder production. Output rose considerably with the releases of new varieties, along with better organization of the sector following establishment of the Tanganyika Lint and Seed Marketing Board in 1956. By 1966, production reached 80,000 tons, or 0.75 percent of world production of 10.7 million tons.

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Tanzania - The Rural and Micro Financial Services Project

2007-06, Mohan, P. C.

Findings Info briefs reports on good practice in ongoing operational, economic and sector work carried out by the World Bank and its member governments in the Africa Region. This issue reports on the Tanzania Rural and Micro Financial Services Project. The project was designed as a Learning and Innovation initiative (2000-2004) with support from an IDA credit of US$2 million. Its objectives were (i) the development of a common policy framework, based on internationally recognized best practices, for rural and microfinance initiatives in the country which would establish an enabling environment for rural and microfinance and increase the quality and returns of subsequent investments by the government agencies and other donors; (ii) increasing the level of knowledge and skills within the industry; and (iii) instituting a program of systematic tracking and analyzing of all related initiatives against a set of common criteria. This info brief gives information on the project impacts as well as lessons learned.

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Tanzania - Urban Sector Rehabilitation

2006-01, World Bank

The Urban Sector Rehabilitation Project (URSP) consisted of a large program of infrastructure rehabilitation works and institutional reform activities covering 8 project towns - Arusha, Iringa, Morogoro, Mbeya, Moshi, Mwanza, Tabora and Tanga. Additional investments in Dodoma and Dar-essalaam were, in comparison, of limited scope and complexity. The project with a Credit of US$ 141.3 million equivalent was implemented by the government between 1997 and 2004. The project objectives were sustainable economic development and urban poverty alleviation through: (i) rehabilitation of basic infrastructure and expansion into high-priority, underserved areas; and (ii) improvement of urban local government management and financing capacity by (a) strengthening the financial, technical and overall operations of the urban local authorities through training and technical assistance; and (b) encouraging private sector and community involvement in urban services delivery and operation and maintenance.

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Tanzania’s Tea Sector : Constraints and Challenges’

2004-12, Baffes, John

In 1968, the government initiated a smallholder tea development program in which all aspects of smallholder tea marketing and trade were turned over to the Tanzania Tea Authority which assumed a wide array of responsibilities. The Authority promoted smallholder tea production. Most of the smallholder tea leaf went to the eight Tea Authority-owned factories for processing, and the rest to factories owned by the estates. Despite its apparent success, there were numerous signs of distress in the smallholder sector. This note describes the constraints and challenges faced by the production of tea in Tanzania.