Africa Region Findings & Good Practice Infobriefs

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These briefs report on ongoing operational, economic, and sector work carried out by the World Bank and its member governments in the Africa Region.

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    Multi-Dimensional Results Measurement in CDD Projects : Experiences from the Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda Social Action Funds
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2007-12) Pidatala, Krishna ; Lenneiye, Nginya Mungai
    In the last decade, Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda have used the Community-Driven Development (CDD) approach to implement projects that exhibit multi-sectoral linkages, complex institutional structures and implementation processes, creative tension between the supply and demand sides, and convergence at the Local Government Authority (LGA) level in environments compounded by the pace of decentralization. The projects have broadened the issue of results focus from the measurement of a few input-output indicators to include intermediate outcomes (which measure beneficiaries potentially reached by outputs produced by the projects). In the process, these projects have been able to scale up from 'isolated boutique-type projects' to a mass production of outputs through participatory decision-making, local capacity development, and community control of resources. At the national level, the projects have contributed to: (a) poverty reduction, (b) improved social welfare, and (c) improved transparency and accountability.
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    Uganda - Integrating Gender into Policy Actions
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2005-04) Canagarajah, Roy S.
    The findings of both macro- and microeconomic analysis of the links between growth and gender inequality have shown that large gender disparities in basic human rights, resources, economic opportunity, and in political voice is directly and indirectly limiting growth in sub-Saharan Africa, and that women and girls are bearing the largest and most direct costs of these inequalities.
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    Uganda’s Nutrition and Early Child Development Project - Counting on Communication
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2005-04) Cabanero-Verzosa, Cecilia
    In 1998, a $34 million World Bank loan for the Nutrition and Early Child Development Project (NECDP) was approved to support the National Program of Action for Children. The NECDP covered about 8,000 communities in 20 of Uganda's 39 districts, selected based on levels of malnutrition, infant mortality, and primary school enrollment rates. The project sought to halve malnutrition among preschool children, raise primary school enrollment, reduce dropout and repetition rates, improve psycho-social and cognitive development, and increase the number of mothers practicing appropriate childcare.
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    Pro-Poor Health Services : The Catholic Health Network in Uganda
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2005-01) Daniele Giusti
    Most private not-for-profit (PNFP) health providers in Uganda are faith-based. They account for a sizeable proportion of the health services delivered in the country and have as their prime concern the provision of services to the poor. These providers are coordinated through umbrella organizations, such as the Catholic, Protestant, and Muslim Medical Bureaus and the Uganda Community Based Health Care Association. This article documents the experiences of the Catholic health network in Uganda and its umbrella organization, the Uganda Catholic Medical Bureau (UCMB) in making health services work for poor people. It demonstrates how the pro-poor ethos derived from a longstanding tradition and the mission of healing by treating and preventing diseases, with a preferential option for the less privileged supported by soft regulation and technical assistance from the umbrella organization can induce a process of activity.
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    Learning by Doing : Uganda’s AIDS Control Project Empowers Local Managers
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2004-11) Valadez, Joseph J. ; Nsubuga, Peter
    Surveillance systems in Uganda detect that HIV prevalence declined from 21.1 percent in 1991 to 6.4 percent in 2001. The most common explanations for this decrease are that the population mobilized itself with the consequence that more people were faithful to their partners, or abstained from sexual contact, and used condoms during sexual intercourse (Low-Beer et al 2003). Although one might debate which of these behavior changes contributed most to the apparent reduction in HIV prevalence, no one would claim that Uganda can now become complacent about its HIV/AIDS programs. Quite the contrary. National HIV/AIDS Committees continue to have the responsibility for both covering their populations with the highest quality prevention, care, support, and treatment programs possible, and to improve them constantly.
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    Monitoring and Evaluation for Results : Lessons from Uganda
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2004-09) Hauge, Arild O. ; Mackay, Keith
    Recent experience with monitoring and evaluation (M&E) in Uganda has shown how M&E can be developed to contribute to national capacity building, rather than become a demanding, but unproductive data collection exercise. Symptoms of M&E overload have been addressed by assigning coordination responsibility to the Office of the Prime Minister. Prospects are now improving for aligning M&E capacity with strengthening cost-effectiveness and achievement of value for money in service delivery.
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    Uganda - Adjustment Operations in Support of Education
    ( 2002-09) Murphy, Patrick D.
    In a bold effort to achieve Universal Primary Education (UPE) by 2000, the Government of Uganda decided in 1996 to remove primary school fees for up to four children in each family (of whom two should be girls). The World Bank supported this effort through an Education Sector Adjustment Credit and Grant (ESAC). The ESAC was designed to assist the government deal with the immediate challenges arising from the UPE policy. The broad development objective of ESAC was to ensure that the public resources needed to sustain UPE were available and that there was improved allocation and more efficient use of these resources. In addition and critically for the Bank the operation was designed to enhance the availability of quality inputs and improve overall sector management.
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    Uganda : Policy, Participation, People
    (Washington, DC, 2002-08) World Bank
    When the government of President Museveni assumed power in Uganda in 1986, it took over a shattered postwar economy. Market-oriented reforms led to a remarkable recovery. International Development Association (IDA) operations in Uganda initially tackled economic recovery, rehabilitation, and stabilization, then turned slowly to institutional and private sector development as the country stabilized. Since 1995, IDA has focused on poverty reduction and social progress. An OED (Operations Evaluation Department) assessment of IDA assistance to Uganda during 1987-99 found that IDA has excelled at policy dialogue, economic and sector work (ESW), and fostering participatory processes; had signal success in mobilizing resources and debt relief; and broadened the stakeholder dialogue on aid coordination. There is room for improvement, however, in some aspects of project implementation. The Bank and other donors were involved on a very high plane in Uganda, and important successes were achieved, partly because of the government's strong political leadership, its eagerness to learn from experience, its good use of technical assistance in core government agencies, and its recognition of the need to deepen its commitment and broaden the ownership of reform.
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    Uganda : The First Urban Project
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2002-02) Mohan, P.C.
    The project's original objectives were to: a) improve living conditions and alleviate poverty in Kampala; b) improve urban financial management; and 3) strengthen institutional capacity. As part of the mid-term restructuring, monitor modifications were made to these objectives: 1) strengthen the Kampala City Council's (KCC) ability to better deliver, finance, and maintain basic urban services for all Kampala residents, particularly the poor; 2) assist KCC in getting demonstratable physical improvements on the ground aimed at gaining credibility with the people it serves; and 3) strengthen the institutional capacity of sector institutions. The Note discusses the impact on the ground and the lessons learned from implementing the project.
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    Uganda : The Sexually Transmitted Infections Project
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 1999-01) Mulusa, Mary
    There is evidence suggesting a change in the HIV incidence in Uganda, where its prevalence has dropped in certain communities, and age groups, most notably among women in the 15-29 years age group. The note reviews key features of the Sexually Transmitted Infections Project in the country, identifying change in sexual behavior as the most important approach to preventing HIV spread. The Project also emphasized on mitigation of the personal impact of AIDS, supporting treatment, training of health workers, and provision of drugs, in addition to institutional development, gender issues, and global partnerships. But regardless, of the high level of general awareness of HIV/AIDS, the positive trends observed do not mean that the epidemic has been overcome in Uganda, where current prevalence levels still present an enormous challenge. Lessons address political commitment, and local ownership as essential to overcome the epidemic, highlighting the work of the Namungalwe Women Task Force, whose activities, partly contributed to mitigating the epidemic. Nonetheless, there is the need to mobilize resources to support HIV/AIDS programs, and to use multi-sectoral interventions to deal with the epidemic, as well as capacity building in technical, and management skills, and, information for monitoring programs in a sustainable manner.