Finance, Competitiveness, and Innovation in Focus

26 items available

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The series captures the experience, innovative approaches and solutions for development of the World Bank Group covering financial sector topics of relevance to both the public and private sectors. The series is comprised of short knowledge notes, policy notes, case studies, lessons learned or a combination therein. This series was formerly known as Finance in Focus.

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  • Publication
    Risk-Based Approaches to Business Regulation: A Note for Reformers
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2020-10-22) Molfetas, Aris; Grava, Lars
    Governments increasingly use risk-based regulation (RBR) to adapt their degree of regulatory control to the actual risks posed by industry sectors, economic activities, and business establishments. Risk-based regulation aims to protect public goods, such as safety, health, and the environment, while at the same time avoiding unnecessary burdens on businesses. When designing regulation and developing models for monitoring and enforcement, risk guides assessments of costs and benefits. This note presents reformers and practitioners with the highlights of an approach to implementing a risk-based regulation system.
  • Publication
    Competitive Fruit and Vegetable Products in Albania
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-12) World Bank Group
    Albania is heavily dependent on its agricultural sector, which accounts for 20.3 percent of GDP, 49 percent of employment and 8.5 percent of total exports. The fruit and vegetable sector represents 20 percent of Albanian agriculture but contributes 36 percent of its exports and this share is expected to increase. The note posits an idea that as the domestic market for many of these products is saturated, Albanian fruits and vegetables have been gaining ground in the Western Balkans and are well positioned to make headway in the EU-28 market as well. However, Albanian producers face many constraints in meeting the rigid and complex demands of the EU market, constraints that an export strategy focused solely on identifying products for export is unlikely to change. The policy paradigm has shifted to approaches that focus on integrating local industries into global value chains that help facilitate technology transfer and create jobs.