Other Procurement Study

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Preliminary Analysis: The Public Procurement Monitoring System of Montenegro

2017-06-30, World Bank

Montenegro is currently in the process of modernizing and restructuring its public procurement system, not only with a view to bringing its procurement system in line with international best practices and complete its accession requirements to enter the EU, but also to constructing more efficient and competitive public procurement, that will enable optimization of results. In order to guarantee that significant improvements are built into the procurement system, the Government of Montenegro has taken several steps to tackle its shortcomings, namely by devising strategies for the development of the procurement system along with action plans that establish specific measures and goals and respective timeframes for completion and tracking the implementation of such measures. The assessments conducted by external entities to the Government of Montenegro have shown that such strategies have been productive in addressing issues in the public procurement system of Montenegro and showcase a steady evolution towards better procurement practices. The analyses introduced by this methodology will most definitely concentrate on performance compliance indicators. These will allow for a more quantitative-based approach to monitoring of the public procurement practices in Montenegro, introducing a less formal concept of monitoring, which is currently restricted to legal and regulatory compliance and emphasizes formal and administrative aspects of procurement. Analyzing and improving the system of procurement is entirely dependent on data available and the analysis of the data for gathering business intelligence and increase productivity of all entities in the system. To this end, guidelines and key performance indicators (KPIs) on how to improve the monitoring, auditing and reporting mechanisms will be introduced. This analysis will also include the benchmarking of the 2015 annual report by the PPA, where monitoring will be assessed in terms of compliance with proposed targets and changes verified up to this point.

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Kyrgyz Republic : Country Procurement Status Review

2012-08, World Bank

The Country Procurement Status Review (CPSR) report was prepared on the basis of the findings from a joint World Bank (WB)/Asian Development Bank (ADB) mission that visited the Kyrgyz Republic in February 2012. The main objectives of the CPSR are: (a) to analyze the Kyrgyz public procurement system, including the existing legal framework, organizational responsibilities, control and oversight mechanisms, capacity, and current procedures and practices, as well as how well these work in practice; and (b) based on these analyses and review, to identify key areas for improvement in public procurement and prepare an action plan for implementation of related revisions to the public procurement system. The report has three chapters: (I) Introduction; (II) Assessment of the Public Procurement System; and (III) Recommendations and Action Plan. A summary of the main findings and recommendations is provided in the Executive Summary at the beginning of the report. The detailed assessment of the Baseline Indicators is provided in Annex C. Additional Provisions for National Competitive Bidding under WB-financed operations is provided in Annex D.

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Guide to Promote the Participation of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in the Public Procurement Market in Montenegro

2017-06-30, World Bank

The sector of small and medium-sized enterprises (hereinafter SMEs) represent an increasingly important segment of Montenegrin economy and have been key drivers of its economic growth and employment for the past several years. With foreign direct investment, this sector could be an important lever of economic development and the main creator of new jobs in the future. In order to survive and develop in the market, these enterprises have to constantly build new competitive benefits. The same can be built within the enterprises themselves through their strengthening and development, but also through mutual cooperation and linking. Because SMEs have an important role in the economic development of each country, it is necessary to encourage and facilitate their participation in public procurement procedures. Taking into account the fact that procurements merge at all levels (national and local), special attention should be paid to get SMEs more closely involved in the procurement procedures with contracting authorities, subject to the application of the LPP. Montenegro has recognized in its agenda through the strategy for the development of the public procurement system for the period 2016-2020 the necessity of active relationship between the state and local self-government on the development and encouragement of SMEs. Based on research carried out in direct communication with the representatives of these entities and their associations, with the aim to assess the readiness of SMEs to adapt to future activities in the field of public procurement, it is evident that they are planning new investments and expansion of business. They are ready to invest in human resources, technical, technological and other facilities necessary for successful business, in order to be competitive in the market. To that end, they expect more support from the state of Montenegro and the local community. In accordance with the orientation and expectations of SMEs this guide is intended to encourage the participation of SMEs at all levels in the area of public procurement.

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Anti-Corruption in Romania: The Way Forward

2017-06, World Bank

The report is organized as follows: the first chapter presents the status quo and diagnoses the reasons for continued corruption in Romania. It examines the perception of corruption by citizens and business along with the consequences. The chapter also proposes a ‘theory of change’ that can support Romania’s anti-corruption agenda in an integrated manner. The second chapter presents a brief analysis of the institutional and legislative framework for anti-corruption initiatives in Romania, highlighting the main achievements from the past years and remaining challenges ahead. The third chapter building on the framework proposed in the previous sections, this chapter proposes policy options to reduce the incentives for corruption, increase the chances of getting caught and enforce sanctions on the corrupt, while implementing measures to change social norms. The first section on reducing corruption proposes the introduction of a meritocratic civil service to make a shift from nepotism and politicization to performance and professionalization of the civil service. At the same time, increasing the transparency of government reduces the incentive for corruption because the decision-making and budget allocation is under scrutiny from citizens and civil society. A transparent government is also an enabling condition for accountable public institutions. Introducing a functioning feedback mechanism and inviting public participation will increase the chances that corrupt public servants, politicians and business people will be caught. At the same time, improving public procurement in accordance with the principles of competition, transparency and integrity, reduces the risks of corruption. The authors intend to use the framework contained in this report for broader engagement and to develop more in-depth sectorial analysis with relevant sector representatives. This could also include some of the priority areas, as proposed in the NAS, such as public procurement, healthcare, education, or management of EU Funds. In each of these areas, the report outlines the next steps that the current administration could take to make progress on anti-corruption in the coming years. The authors intend to partner with interested government institutions and international partners interested in making progress on this agenda to implement the report’s findings.