Other Procurement Study

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  • Publication
    Guide to Promote the Participation of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in the Public Procurement Market in Montenegro
    (World Bank, Podgorica, 2017-06-30) World Bank
    The sector of small and medium-sized enterprises (hereinafter SMEs) represent an increasingly important segment of Montenegrin economy and have been key drivers of its economic growth and employment for the past several years. With foreign direct investment, this sector could be an important lever of economic development and the main creator of new jobs in the future. In order to survive and develop in the market, these enterprises have to constantly build new competitive benefits. The same can be built within the enterprises themselves through their strengthening and development, but also through mutual cooperation and linking. Because SMEs have an important role in the economic development of each country, it is necessary to encourage and facilitate their participation in public procurement procedures. Taking into account the fact that procurements merge at all levels (national and local), special attention should be paid to get SMEs more closely involved in the procurement procedures with contracting authorities, subject to the application of the LPP. Montenegro has recognized in its agenda through the strategy for the development of the public procurement system for the period 2016-2020 the necessity of active relationship between the state and local self-government on the development and encouragement of SMEs. Based on research carried out in direct communication with the representatives of these entities and their associations, with the aim to assess the readiness of SMEs to adapt to future activities in the field of public procurement, it is evident that they are planning new investments and expansion of business. They are ready to invest in human resources, technical, technological and other facilities necessary for successful business, in order to be competitive in the market. To that end, they expect more support from the state of Montenegro and the local community. In accordance with the orientation and expectations of SMEs this guide is intended to encourage the participation of SMEs at all levels in the area of public procurement.
  • Publication
    Kyrgyz Republic : Country Procurement Status Review
    (Washington, DC, 2012-08) World Bank
    The Country Procurement Status Review (CPSR) report was prepared on the basis of the findings from a joint World Bank (WB)/Asian Development Bank (ADB) mission that visited the Kyrgyz Republic in February 2012. The main objectives of the CPSR are: (a) to analyze the Kyrgyz public procurement system, including the existing legal framework, organizational responsibilities, control and oversight mechanisms, capacity, and current procedures and practices, as well as how well these work in practice; and (b) based on these analyses and review, to identify key areas for improvement in public procurement and prepare an action plan for implementation of related revisions to the public procurement system. The report has three chapters: (I) Introduction; (II) Assessment of the Public Procurement System; and (III) Recommendations and Action Plan. A summary of the main findings and recommendations is provided in the Executive Summary at the beginning of the report. The detailed assessment of the Baseline Indicators is provided in Annex C. Additional Provisions for National Competitive Bidding under WB-financed operations is provided in Annex D.
  • Publication
    Solomon Islands : Operational Procurement Review
    (Washington, DC, 2012-06) World Bank
    Solomon Islands is a remote, scattered archipelago about 1,900 km northeast of Australia in the South Pacific, with terrain ranging from about 1,000 mountainous islands to low-lying coral atolls stretching in a 1,450 km chain east of Papua New Guinea across the Coral Sea to Vanuatu. The archipelago covers a total area of 725,197 sq km (approx 280,000 sq miles) with the main islands being Choiseul, New Georgia, Santa Isabel, Guadalcanal, Malaita, and Makira. The Solomon Islands are situated among one of the world's most disaster-prone geographic regions in what is known as the circum-pacific belt, earthquake belt or ring of fire. The low-lying coastal regions of the Solomon Islands can also be subject to damage from tsunamis. In addition, the zone in which the Solomon Islands archipelago is located is an area where cyclones are formed. The Solomon Islands is thus subject to many natural Threats, earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, tropical cyclones and windstorms, floods, landslides, and droughts. The objective of this report is to review the Solomon Islands existing national legislation, policies, procedures, practices, institutional arrangements and organizational capacity for public sector procurement to assess both their acceptability for use in national competitive bidding under World Bank-financed projects and, in the process, provide a benchmarking analysis in key thematic areas.
  • Publication
    Pakistan - Federal Procurement Baseline Indicator Systems Assessment
    (World Bank, 2009-06-01) World Bank
    The Baseline Indicators (BLIs) assessment has been conducted by the Development Partners and the Government of Pakistan as a precursor to carrying forward the Government's efforts to upgrade the Country Procurement Systems (CPS) to international standards and to help it assess the level and type of technical assistance required for achieving this objective. The assessment, being the first phase of a comprehensive procurement performance assessment, covered the four pillars as well as all the indicators and sub-indicators in each pillar based on a review of the existing regulatory framework and the institutional and operational arrangements and as provided for in the Organization for Economic Development (OECD) Development Advisory Committee (DAC) guidelines. While the views expressed in the report were the subject of discussions at the stakeholders' workshop, they do not necessarily represent the views of the Government of Pakistan. The result indicates that compared to the standard required for a transparent, efficient and effective procurement system, the existing system in Pakistan needs to be improved substantially. The highest achieved rating is for pillar one, the legislative and regulatory framework, which is an amalgam of specific legislation and sub-legislation impacting the procurement activity of the government and the older legislative instruments affecting the overall operations of the public and/or the private sectors. The Public Procurement Regulatory Authority (PPRA) is the apex body of the institutional framework (pillar two) governing the public procurement arena. The Pakistan Engineering Council (PEC) was involved as a member of the Kazi committee to prepare a standard bidding document and standard General Conditions of Contract (GCC) for all engineering contracts. Improvements in improving the procurement market and operations (pillar three) can only happen when substantial progress has been achieved in reforming pillars one and two of the procurement framework. Integrity and efficiency in the public procurement system (pillar four) is the ultimate goal of all procurement systems and is not easily achieved. This, therefore, requires changes not only within the specific procurement related legislation, but also across a raft of other legislation to ensure an overall enabling environment. Coupled to this is the need to motivate decision makers and civil society to actively participate in ensuring the implementation of the revised legislation. This will require several years, but the effort could be started at an early stage of the reform process.
  • Publication
    West Bank and Gaza : Country Procurement Issues Paper
    (Washington, DC, 2008-06) World Bank
    The main aim of the CPIP is to assess the current state of pubic procurement in West Bank and Gaza in the form of a ''snap shot'' and accordingly, to provide a partial assessment, broadly along the lines of the OPCS paper that would address the following objectives. First, to assess the latest progress with regard to the procurement reform recommended by the 2004 CPAR and the commitment of the Palestinian Authority (PA) to pursue the reform. Next, to report on the link between public sector procurement and the local private sector, in terms of competitiveness, performance, constraints, and commercial practices affecting public procurement. Finally, compile a set of recommendations that would strengthenprocurement arrangements and functions under future Bank-financed operations in the WB&G. These could also serve as basis to suggest specific improvements in current procurement processes, as well as next steps towards the achievement of a procurement system that meets internationally recognized standards.
  • Publication
    Kosovo : Operational Procurement Review
    (Washington, DC, 2004-06) World Bank
    This Operational Procurement Report (OPR) provides an assessment of the public-sector procurement system in Kosovo, including that on the legislative framework, the responsibilities and capacity of the institutions entrusted with regulatory and review powers, the efficacy of current procurement practices, and on the environment. The report makes recommendations to bring about legislative, institutional and procedural improvements in the conduct of public procurement, and to bolster the capacity of public-sector institutions to conduct procurement. The report also examines the performance of procurement in projects financed by the Bank, assesses the fiduciary risk to Bank funds from procurement operations in Kosovo, and makes recommendations for the design of procurement arrangements on new Bank-financed projects, and for future supervision of procurement to mitigate that risk. Among the various report recommendations, outlined are the enactment of a transitional legal instrument and completion of the legislative framework for public procurement. Furthermore, greater transparency and accountability of public officials conducting procurement transactions should be ensured, while technical capacity for public procurement should be built within the public sector. Most importantly, over the medium term, the new Law on Public Procurement should be amended.