Other Procurement Study

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  • Publication
    World Bank Group Sanctions Board Law Digest 2019
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2020) World Bank Group Sanctions Board
    This edition of the Law Digest for the World Bank Group's Sanctions Board presents structured summaries of the Sanctions Board's precedent as set out through more than 100 decisions issued since 2007. The Law Digest also includes key data relating to the work of the Sanctions Board and the World Bank Group's larger sanctions system. Themes covered in this digest include the scope of the Sanctions Board's authority, various types of procedural and evidentiary questions in sanctions proceedings, and the Sanctions Board's overall analysis of the allegations of fraud, corruption, collusion, and obstruction in projects supported by the World Bank Group that form the core of individual sanctions cases.
  • Publication
    Improving Efficiency in Public Procurement in Georgia
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-06) Turkewitz, Joel; Nozadze, Sandro; Davenport, Stephen R.; Sjoberg, Fredrik; Mellon, Jonathan; Brough, Mark; La Cascia, Hunt; Agar, Mediha; La Cascia, Joseph Huntington
    The document provides a brief overview of the size and composition of public procurement. It then examines performance in relation to two key outcome variables – the success rate of competitive tenders, and the level of competition in open procedures. The nature of the performance issues in these two areas are explored, and specific recommendations are developed for improving performance in the short to medium term. A different perspective on performance is then provided through examining the degree to which small and medium firms participate in procurement tenders and are awarded contracts. A final section provides a limited number of recommendations on steps to establish a continuous process of data analysis and performance evaluation.
  • Publication
    Improving Transparency and Accountability in Public-Private Partnerships: Disclosure Diagnostic Report - Honduras
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018) World Bank
    A joint Government of Honduras and World Bank team conducted a study in Honduras between January and June 2017, using the Public-Private Partnership (PPP) Disclosure Diagnostic template recommended by the World Bank Framework for Disclosure of Information in PPPs. This study has been consolidated in the form of a PPP Disclosure Diagnostic Report for Honduras. The Diagnostic Report examines the political, legal, and institutional environment for disclosure in PPPs. Based on a gap assessment exercise with key political, legal, institutional, and process findings benchmarked against the World Bank Framework, the Diagnostic Report makes specific recommendations to improve disclosure. The recommendations include a customized framework for disclosure of PPPs in Honduras.
  • Publication
    Procurement and Service Delivery : An Overview of Efforts to Improve Governance of Public Procurement at Local Levels in South Asia
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-11-01) World Bank
    Over the past decade, the overly centralized governance structures commonly found across South Asia have begun to change, with program and fiscal responsibility being devolved to local level government authorities and community-based organizations. This has led to greater participation of ordinary citizens in governance and public decision-making. The move to localize decision-making creates enormous opportunities for increasing the effectiveness of public spending since it creates the potential for establishing direct accountability of governance mechanisms to citizens. It also raises a number of significant challenges in ensuring that public funds are spent effectively at the local level, and provokes important new questions regarding the manner by which governments can maintain oversight over the quality of assets. This paper provides an overview of the activities supported under the project, with the aim of contributing to a broader perspective on improving governance and service delivery at the local level. The paper is divided into three parts. In part one the authors explore the challenges of spending money effectively at the local level, with a special focus on the governance challenges that exist in public procurement. In part two, the authors explore different approaches to addressing those challenges by discussing innovative work that has taken place with the support of the Project in the areas of regulation, contracting, transparency, and accountability. In part three, the authors analyze some broader themes and key questions that remain to be addressed while developing a strategic research and operational agenda around local level procurement.
  • Publication
    Pakistan - Federal Procurement Baseline Indicator Systems Assessment
    (World Bank, 2009-06-01) World Bank
    The Baseline Indicators (BLIs) assessment has been conducted by the Development Partners and the Government of Pakistan as a precursor to carrying forward the Government's efforts to upgrade the Country Procurement Systems (CPS) to international standards and to help it assess the level and type of technical assistance required for achieving this objective. The assessment, being the first phase of a comprehensive procurement performance assessment, covered the four pillars as well as all the indicators and sub-indicators in each pillar based on a review of the existing regulatory framework and the institutional and operational arrangements and as provided for in the Organization for Economic Development (OECD) Development Advisory Committee (DAC) guidelines. While the views expressed in the report were the subject of discussions at the stakeholders' workshop, they do not necessarily represent the views of the Government of Pakistan. The result indicates that compared to the standard required for a transparent, efficient and effective procurement system, the existing system in Pakistan needs to be improved substantially. The highest achieved rating is for pillar one, the legislative and regulatory framework, which is an amalgam of specific legislation and sub-legislation impacting the procurement activity of the government and the older legislative instruments affecting the overall operations of the public and/or the private sectors. The Public Procurement Regulatory Authority (PPRA) is the apex body of the institutional framework (pillar two) governing the public procurement arena. The Pakistan Engineering Council (PEC) was involved as a member of the Kazi committee to prepare a standard bidding document and standard General Conditions of Contract (GCC) for all engineering contracts. Improvements in improving the procurement market and operations (pillar three) can only happen when substantial progress has been achieved in reforming pillars one and two of the procurement framework. Integrity and efficiency in the public procurement system (pillar four) is the ultimate goal of all procurement systems and is not easily achieved. This, therefore, requires changes not only within the specific procurement related legislation, but also across a raft of other legislation to ensure an overall enabling environment. Coupled to this is the need to motivate decision makers and civil society to actively participate in ensuring the implementation of the revised legislation. This will require several years, but the effort could be started at an early stage of the reform process.
  • Publication
    West Bank and Gaza : Country Procurement Issues Paper
    (Washington, DC, 2008-06) World Bank
    The main aim of the CPIP is to assess the current state of pubic procurement in West Bank and Gaza in the form of a ''snap shot'' and accordingly, to provide a partial assessment, broadly along the lines of the OPCS paper that would address the following objectives. First, to assess the latest progress with regard to the procurement reform recommended by the 2004 CPAR and the commitment of the Palestinian Authority (PA) to pursue the reform. Next, to report on the link between public sector procurement and the local private sector, in terms of competitiveness, performance, constraints, and commercial practices affecting public procurement. Finally, compile a set of recommendations that would strengthenprocurement arrangements and functions under future Bank-financed operations in the WB&G. These could also serve as basis to suggest specific improvements in current procurement processes, as well as next steps towards the achievement of a procurement system that meets internationally recognized standards.
  • Publication
    Maldives : Electronic Government Procurement Readiness Assessment and Roadmap
    (Washington, DC, 2007-05) World Bank
    The assessment focuses on the degree of readiness of Government of The Maldives's (GoTM's) current public procurement environment for making a transition from traditional paper-based, manual methods of procurement transaction processing and communication to electronic government procurement (e-GP). The e-GP Assessment was discussed individually with informed respondents in the public and private sectors, who provided advice or comment on the degree of readiness of nine key components related to e-GP: government leadership, human resource planning, procurement planning and management, procurement policy, procurement legislation and regulation, Internet and electronic infrastructure, standards, private sector integration, and current e-GP systems and initiatives. The assessment found: adequate evidence that Internet and electronic infrastructure are in place and supported, little evidence that government leadership, planning and management, procurement regulation, standards, private sector integration, or e-GP systems are in place and being supported; no evidence that human resource planning, procurement legislation, or procurement policy were in place. This report outlines a strategy to make ready and implement electronic government procurement policies, infrastructure, and initiatives.