Disease Control Priorities

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Building on its predecessors DCP1 (1993) and DCP2 (2006), the third edition, published by The World Bank Group, provides the most up-to-date evidence on intervention efficacy and program effectiveness for the leading causes of global disease burden. It goes beyond previous efforts by providing systematic economic evaluation of policy choices affecting the access, uptake and quality of interventions and delivery platforms for low-and middle-income countries. Complete volumes of DCP3 will be published electronically and in hard copy in 2015 and 2016. Disease Control Priorities Network (DCPN) at University of Washington’s Department of Global Health, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, promotes and supports the use of economic evaluation for priority setting at both global and national levels through policy advocacy, country engagement, and the production of Disease Control Priorities, Third Edition (DCP3).
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Disease Control Priorities, Third Edition: Volume 6. Major Infectious Diseases

2017-11-06, Holmes, King K., Bertozzi, Stefano, Bloom, Barry R., Jha, Prabhat, Holmes, King K., Bertozzi, Stefano, Bloom, Barry R., Jha, Prabhat

Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death globally, particularly among children and young adults. The spread of new pathogens and the threat of antimicrobial resistance pose particular challenges in combating these diseases. Major Infectious Diseases identifies feasible, cost-effective packages of interventions and strategies across delivery platforms to prevent and treat HIV/AIDS, other sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, malaria, adult febrile illness, viral hepatitis, and neglected tropical diseases. The volume emphasizes the need to effectively address emerging antimicrobial resistance, strengthen health systems, and increase access to care. The attainable goals are to reduce incidence, develop innovative approaches, and optimize existing tools in resource-constrained settings.