IFC Annual Reports & Financial Statements

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International Finance Corporation is a member of the World Bank Group. IFC’s purpose is to create opportunity for people to escape poverty and improve their lives by: promoting open and competitive markets in developing countries, supporting companies and other private sector partners where there is a gap, helping generate productive jobs and deliver essential services to the underserved, and catalyzing and mobilizing other sources of finance for private enterprise development. \r + \r + To achieve our purpose, IFC offers development impact solutions through firm-level interventions (direct investments, Advisory Services, and IFC Asset Management Company), standard setting, and business-enabling environment work.

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  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2020: Transformation
    (Washington, DC: International Finance Corporation, 2020-10-07) International Finance Corporation
    IFC — a member of the World Bank Group — is the largest global development institution focused on the private sector in emerging markets. We work in more than 100 countries, using our capital, expertise, and influence to create markets and opportunities in developing countries. In fiscal year 2020, we invested $22 billion in private companies and financial institutions in developing countries, leveraging the power of the private sector to end extreme poverty and boost shared prosperity. For more information, visit www.ifc.org.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2019: Investing for Impact
    (Washington, DC: International Finance Corporation, 2019-10-10) International Finance Corporation
    IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, is the largest global development institution focused on the private sector in developing countries. Established in 1956, IFC is owned by 185 member countries, a group that collectively determines our policies. We leverage our products and services—as well as those of other institutions across the World Bank Group—to create markets that address the biggest challenges of our time that developing countries face. We apply our financial resources, technical expertise, global experience, and innovative thinking to provide sustainable market-based solutions that bring widespread benefits. IFC is also a leading mobilizer of third-party resources for projects. Our willingness to engage in difficult environments and our leadership in crowding in private finance enable us to have a development impact well beyond our direct resources.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2018: Redefining Development Finance
    (Washington, DC: International Finance Corporation, 2018-09-27) International Finance Corporation
    IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, is the largest global development institution focused on the private sector in developing countries. Established in 1956, IFC is owned by 184 member countries, a group that collectively determines our policies. In FY18, IFC invested $23.3 billion, including nearly $11.7 billion mobilized from other investors. Our comprehensive approach helped businesses innovate, build internationally competitive industrial sectors, and create better jobs.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2014 : Big Challenges, Big Solutions
    (Washington, DC: World Bank Group, 2014) International Finance Corporation
    International Finance Corporation (IFC or the Corporation) is the largest global development institution focused on the private sector in developing countries. Established in 1956, IFC is owned by 184 member countries, a group that collectively determines its policies. IFC is a member of the World Bank Group (WBG)1 but is a legal entity separate and distinct from IBRD, IDA, MIGA, and ICSID, with its own Articles of Agreement, share capital, financial structure, management, and staff. Membership in IFC is open only to member countries of IBRD. At the 2013 Spring Meetings, the WBG adopted two ambitious goals: to end extreme poverty by 2030 and to boost shared prosperity for the poorest 40 percent in developing countries. At the Annual Meetings in October 2013, the Board of Governors approved the first strategy for the WBG focused on delivery of transformational solutions, marshaling combined resources more effectively, and accelerating collaboration with the private sector and our development partners. IFC s strategic focus areas are: strengthening the focus on frontier markets; addressing climate change and ensuring environmental and social sustainability; addressing constraints to private sector growth in infrastructure, health, education, and the food-supply chain; developing local financial markets; and building long-term client relationships in emerging markets.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2010 : Where Innovation Meets Impact, Volume 1. Main Report
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2010) International Finance Corporation
    More than 200 million people in the developing world were out of work this year. Over 1 billion are hungry, while millions more are confronting the threat that climate change poses. The United Nations estimates that 884 million people don't have safe drinking water and more than 2.6 billion people lack basic sanitation. The population of the developing world will expand by a third over the next four decades, growth that will strain already weak infrastructure. In this environment, International Finance Corporation (IFC) is innovating to create opportunity where it's needed most. IFC committed a record $18 billion in fiscal year 2010, $12.7 billion of which was for own account. We invested in 528 projects, an 18 percent increase from FY09. Advisory Services portfolio comprised 736 active projects valued at more than $850 million, with annual expenditures totaling $268 million. Countries served by the International Development Association, or IDA, accounted for nearly half our investments 255 projects totaling $4.9 billion and more than 60 percent of Advisory Services expenditures. Sub-Saharan Africa accounted for 19 percent of our investment commitments and 25 percent of Advisory Services expenditures. The invested a record $1.64 billion in clean energy, leveraging $6.8 billion, while climate change related projects grew to 15 percent of the value of our Advisory Services portfolio. The investments in microfinance rose 10 percent to $400 million, expanding microfinance portfolio to $1.2 billion.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2009 : Their/Our Story, Creating Opportunity Where It's Needed Most
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2009) International Finance Corporation
    The global economic crisis has opened an uncertain chapter, especially for the 2.5 billion people who live on less than $2 a day. Many of them lack access to electricity, or clean water, or basic health care. For at least a decade, economic growth in developing countries helped expand the availability of basic necessities while steadily reducing the number of people in poverty. But this year, the number of people in extreme poverty is expected to be much higher than was predicted before the crisis. Unemployment is rising. Yet many countries lack the domestic resources needed to speed up development. International Finance Corporation (IFC) has responded swiftly and creatively to improve the lives of the most vulnerable people by working with the private sector to create conditions for sustainable prosperity, wherever the need is greatest. IFC has quickly ramped up its advisory efforts and mobilized its donor partners to help governments, clients, and markets cope with the crisis and recover speedily. Priorities include: helping financial institutions better manage their risks and their nonperforming loans; complementing investment efforts in banking for small and medium enterprises, microfinance, and housing finance with advice to financial institutions; supporting governments' efforts to keep trade flowing with advice on trade logistics; helping governments facing larger deficits widen their tax base; encouraging governments to simplify their bankruptcy systems to allow indebted companies to recover faster; advising boards of directors on risk management and crisis intervention; and helping governments redesign public-private infrastructure projects that face crisis-related difficulties.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2008 : Creating Opportunity, Volume 1
    (Washington, DC, 2008) International Finance Corporation
    The International Finance Corporation (IFC) annual report continues an approach pioneered last year, combining information on the investments and advisory services, sustainability, development effectiveness, and donor partnerships. The report covers fiscal 2008 (July 1, 2007, through June 30, 2008) and discusses the year's new business as well as the performance and development results of the portfolio. In FY08, new investments totaled $16.2 billion, rising 34 percent from the previous year. The IFC seeks to enhance the accountability and to articulate the vision, core corporate values, purpose, and the way the IFC works for a wide range of stakeholders: client companies, governments, partners, local communities affected by the activities, advocacy organizations, investors, and the staff.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2006 : Increasing Impact, Volume 2
    (Washington, DC, 2006) International Finance Corporation
    The International Finance Corporation (IFC), in its 50th year, is the largest provider of multilateral financing for private sector projects in the developing world. In fiscal 2006, it committed $6.7 billion in funds from its own account and mobilized an additional $1.6 billion through syndications and $1.3 billion through structured finance. Based on the total costs of the private sector projects it helped finance this year, each $1 in IFC commitments for its own account resulted in an additional $2.88 in funding from other sources. Altogether, IFC supported 284 investment projects in 66 countries. This year nearly a quarter of IFC commitments were in low-income or high-risk countries, demonstrating the viability of private enterprise even in difficult environments. IFC's investment commitments to firms operating in the Middle East and North Africa more than doubled in fiscal 2006, and commitments for private sector projects in Sub-Saharan Africa increased nearly 60 percent. IFC introduced a new development outcome tracking system for investment operations to measure and track results throughout the life of a project; a similar system was implemented to monitor the development impact of all active technical assistance and advisory projects.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2005 : Investing in Progress with Experience, Innovation, and Partnership, Volume 2. Financial Statements, Projects, Portfolio, and Organizational Information
    (Washington, DC, 2005) International Finance Corporation
    The International Finance Corporation is at the forefront of private sector development: it is redefining how poverty can be reduced and lives improved through a stronger private sector in emerging markets. Accomplishing this goal means reaching people, regions, and sectors that have not yet shared in the overall growth of emerging markets. It means innovation-forging new partnerships with governments and other multilateral institutions, identifying new roles for the private sector, creating products that develop financial markets, and making it easier for disadvantaged people to launch a business or own a home. It means building on significant strengths in many countries and industries-helping established enterprises become more competitive and sustainable as they expand their operations or extend their reach into new markets. It also means bringing to developing economies proven products and techniques, both from industrialized countries and, increasingly, from other developing countries. Above all, it means tailoring global expertise to local needs. This annual report outlines the strategic objectives of the institution in expanding access to finance, increasing private participation in key sectors, helping successful enterprises grow, focusing where needs are greatest, and ensuring sustainability.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2005 : Investing in Progress with Experience, Innovation, and Partnership, Volume 1
    (Washington, D, 2005) International Finance Corporation
    The International Finance Corporation is at the forefront of private sector development: it is redefining how poverty can be reduced and lives improved through a stronger private sector in emerging markets. Accomplishing this goal means reaching people, regions, and sectors that have not yet shared in the overall growth of emerging markets. It means innovation-forging new partnerships with governments and other multilateral institutions, identifying new roles for the private sector, creating products that develop financial markets, and making it easier for disadvantaged people to launch a business or own a home. It means building on significant strengths in many countries and industries-helping established enterprises become more competitive and sustainable as they expand their operations or extend their reach into new markets. It also means bringing to developing economies proven products and techniques, both from industrialized countries and, increasingly, from other developing countries. Above all, it means tailoring global expertise to local needs. This annual report outlines the strategic objectives of the institution in expanding access to finance, increasing private participation in key sectors, helping successful enterprises grow, focusing where needs are greatest, and ensuring sustainability.