IFC Annual Reports & Financial Statements

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International Finance Corporation is a member of the World Bank Group. IFC’s purpose is to create opportunity for people to escape poverty and improve their lives by: promoting open and competitive markets in developing countries, supporting companies and other private sector partners where there is a gap, helping generate productive jobs and deliver essential services to the underserved, and catalyzing and mobilizing other sources of finance for private enterprise development. \r + \r + To achieve our purpose, IFC offers development impact solutions through firm-level interventions (direct investments, Advisory Services, and IFC Asset Management Company), standard setting, and business-enabling environment work.

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  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2013 : The Power of Partnerships, Volume 2. Financials and Projects
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2013-09-17) International Finance Corporation
    The International Financial Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, is the largest global development institution focused exclusively on the private sector in developing countries. This report summarizes IFC’s role in helping the private sector create jobs and opportunity in developing countries. It highlights how we spur innovation, influence policy, provide a demonstration effect for others, and strive to maximize our development impact. Volume 2 provides the financial statements.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2013 : The Power of Partnerships
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2013-09-17) International Finance Corporation
    The International Financial Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, is the largest global development institution focused exclusively on the private sector in developing countries. This report summarizes IFC’s role in helping the private sector create jobs and opportunity in developing countries. It highlights how we spur innovation, influence policy, provide a demonstration effect for others, and strive to maximize our development impact.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2012 : Innovation, Influence, Demonstration, Volume 2. Results
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2012) International Finance Corporation
    This annual report of the International Finance Corporation (IFC) summarizes the innovation and leadership roles in the private sector during fiscal year 2012. The IFC invested a record $20.4 billion in 103 developing countries, reflecting a doubling of annual commitments over the last five years. Those investments included nearly $5 billion mobilized from other investors, and an investment for Sub-Saharan Africa totaling $2.7 billion, nearly twice as much as five years ago. The advisory services program expenditures grew to $197 million, up more than 50 percent over the last five years. Advisory services also helped 33 client governments introduce 56 investment-climate reforms that will improve access to basic services for more than 16 million people. IFC investment clients helped support 2.5 million jobs in 2011 and made 23 million loans totaling more than $200 billion to micro, small, and medium enterprises. Net income before grants to the International Development Association (IDA) totaled $1.66 billion. The IFC has invested more than $23 billion in IDA countries, nearly $6 billion of it in fiscal year 2012 alone.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2009 : Their/Our Story, Creating Opportunity Where It's Needed Most
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2009) International Finance Corporation
    The global economic crisis has opened an uncertain chapter, especially for the 2.5 billion people who live on less than $2 a day. Many of them lack access to electricity, or clean water, or basic health care. For at least a decade, economic growth in developing countries helped expand the availability of basic necessities while steadily reducing the number of people in poverty. But this year, the number of people in extreme poverty is expected to be much higher than was predicted before the crisis. Unemployment is rising. Yet many countries lack the domestic resources needed to speed up development. International Finance Corporation (IFC) has responded swiftly and creatively to improve the lives of the most vulnerable people by working with the private sector to create conditions for sustainable prosperity, wherever the need is greatest. IFC has quickly ramped up its advisory efforts and mobilized its donor partners to help governments, clients, and markets cope with the crisis and recover speedily. Priorities include: helping financial institutions better manage their risks and their nonperforming loans; complementing investment efforts in banking for small and medium enterprises, microfinance, and housing finance with advice to financial institutions; supporting governments' efforts to keep trade flowing with advice on trade logistics; helping governments facing larger deficits widen their tax base; encouraging governments to simplify their bankruptcy systems to allow indebted companies to recover faster; advising boards of directors on risk management and crisis intervention; and helping governments redesign public-private infrastructure projects that face crisis-related difficulties.
  • Publication
    IFC Annual Report 2005 : Investing in Progress with Experience, Innovation, and Partnership, Volume 1
    (Washington, D, 2005) International Finance Corporation
    The International Finance Corporation is at the forefront of private sector development: it is redefining how poverty can be reduced and lives improved through a stronger private sector in emerging markets. Accomplishing this goal means reaching people, regions, and sectors that have not yet shared in the overall growth of emerging markets. It means innovation-forging new partnerships with governments and other multilateral institutions, identifying new roles for the private sector, creating products that develop financial markets, and making it easier for disadvantaged people to launch a business or own a home. It means building on significant strengths in many countries and industries-helping established enterprises become more competitive and sustainable as they expand their operations or extend their reach into new markets. It also means bringing to developing economies proven products and techniques, both from industrialized countries and, increasingly, from other developing countries. Above all, it means tailoring global expertise to local needs. This annual report outlines the strategic objectives of the institution in expanding access to finance, increasing private participation in key sectors, helping successful enterprises grow, focusing where needs are greatest, and ensuring sustainability.
  • Publication
    The IFC Difference : 2001 Annual Report, Volume 1
    (Washington, DC, 2001) International Finance Corporation
    This 2001 Annual Report for the International Finance Corporation (IFC) presents financial highlights, IFC products and services, the investment portfolio, regional reports, project evaluations, and the organization's financial statements.