Water Papers

169 items available

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Water Papers are produced by the Water Global Practice, taking up the work of the predecessor Water Unit, Transport, Water and ICT Department, Sustainable Development Vice Presidency.

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From Waste to Resource - Shifting Paradigms for Smarter Wastewater Interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean: Background Paper VI. Market Potential and Business Models for Resource Recovery Products

2019, World Bank

This background paper is part of the supporting material for the report “From Waste to Resource: Shifting Paradigms for Smarter Wastewater Interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean,” a product of the “Wastewater: from waste to resource,” an initiative of the World Bank Water Global Practice.

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Wastewater: From Waste to Resource - The Case of Atotonilco de Tula, Mexico

2018-03, World Bank

A set of case studies was prepared as part of the World Bank’s Water Global Practice initiative 'Wastewater. Shifting paradigms: from waste to resource' to document existing experiences in the water sector on the topic. The case studies highlight innovative financing and contractual arrangements, innovative regulations and legislation and innovative project designs that promote integrated planning, resource recovery and that enhance the financial and environmental sustainability of wastewater treatment plants. This case study documents Atotonilco de Tula, Mexico.

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Modernizing Weather, Water, and Climate Services: A Road Map for Bhutan

2015-07-21, World Bank Group

The main objective of this technical assistance paper is to provide recommendations to the Royal Government of Bhutan for modernizing its hydrometeorological services, including capacity strengthening for disasterrelated early warning systems (EWSs). The DHMS does not have a national hydromet services policy but is in the process of preparing a strategic document to guide its modernization and institutional reform process. This technical assistance paper contributes to this process and proposes a road map for transforming the DHMS into a modern service delivery agency.

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India Groundwater Governance Case Study

2011-06, Garduño, Héctor, Romani, Saleem, Sengupta, Buba, Tuinhof, Albert, Davis, Richard

Groundwater comprises 97 percent of the worlds readily accessible freshwater and provides the rural, urban, industrial and irrigation water supply needs of 2 billion people around the world. As the more easily accessed surface water resources are already being used, pressure on groundwater is growing. In the last few decades, this pressure has been evident through rapidly increasing pumping of groundwater, accelerated by the availability of cheap drilling and pumping technologies and, in some countries, energy subsidies that distort decisions about exploiting groundwater. This accelerated growth in groundwater exploitation unplanned, unmanaged, and largely invisible has been dubbed by prominent hydro geologists the silent revolution. It is a paradox that such a vast and highly valuable resource which is likely to become even more important as climate change increasingly affects surface water sources has been so neglected by governments and the development community at a time when interest and support for the water sector as a whole is at an all-time high. This case study is a background paper for the World Bank economic and sector analysis (ESW) entitled too big to fail: the paradox of groundwater governance that aims to understand and address the paradox at the heart of the groundwater governance challenge in order to elevate the need for investing in and promoting proactive reforms toward its management. The project examines the impediments to better governance of groundwater, and explores opportunities for using groundwater to help developing countries adapt to climate change. Its recommendations will guide the Bank in its investments on groundwater and provide the Bank's contributions to the Global Environment Facility (GEF) funded global project groundwater governance: a framework for country action. The case study focused on the national, state and local levels. At the national and state levels, it analyzed the policy, legal, and institutional arrangements to identify the demand and supply management and incentive structures that have been established for groundwater management. At the local level, it assessed the operations, successes, and constraints facing local institutions in the governance of a number of aquifers within peninsula India, on the coast and on the plain of the Ganges river valley.

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Batoka Gorge Hydroelectric Scheme: A Macroeconomic Assessment of Public Investment Options

2019-01, World Bank

Maximizing the benefits from public sector investments requires a clear, predictable, and transparent process informed by robust analyses that can facilitate multicriteria considerations of different options and alternatives. However, the tools available to governments to assess the costs and benefits of different investment strategies are often too general or specific to determine the optimal investment strategy. This paper aims to improve the tools available to facilitate the assessment of the macroeconomic implications of large infrastructure projects and enhance the capacity for management of public investment decisions. The macroeconomic assessment of public investment options (MAPIO) model was applied to the Batoka Gorge hydroelectric scheme to provide an analysis of impacts on key macroeconomic variables. The MAPIO model shows the project provides a robust financial and economic investment option with a net positive impact on the national economies in both Zambia and Zimbabwe. The estimates are considered conservative and the returns remain robust when subjecting the model to extreme assumptions to test the sensitivity of the results. However, it is important to acknowledge the model limitations, which does not include noneconomic benefits, costs, or impacts on other sectors. Any investment decision should involve a multicriteria assessment that considers the full range of options and alternatives that may be available to achieving the development objectives.

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Wastewater: From Waste to Resource - The Case of Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia

2018-03, World Bank

A set of case studies was prepared as part of the World Bank’s Water Global Practice initiative 'Wastewater. Shifting paradigms: from waste to resource' to document existing experiences in the water sector on the topic. The case studies highlight innovative financing and contractual arrangements, innovative regulations and legislation and innovative project designs that promote integrated planning, resource recovery and that enhance the financial and environmental sustainability of wastewater treatment plants. This case study documents Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia.

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The Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Protocol for Use by World Bank Clients : Lessons Learned and Recommendations

2014-06-30, Liden, Rikard, Lyon, Kimberly

As a mature technology, hydropower has by far the largest installed capacity of any renewable source of electricity generation. In 1998, in the face of escalating pressure, the World Commission on Dams (WCD) was established by the World Bank and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to review the development effectiveness of large dams and establish a comprehensive set of guidelines for the design, implementation, and operation of dams and their decommissioning. Following the final report of the WCD, the hydropower industry took many steps to operationalize its key recommendations and to improve environmental and social management of hydropower globally. In an effort to improve its performance and provide a consistent approach for assessment, the industry partnered with civil society, policymakers, and financiers around the principles of sustainable hydropower. The output of this process is the multi-stakeholder hydropower sustainability assessment protocol (hereafter referred to as the protocol).The main purpose of this report is to reflect on the applicability of the protocol in developing country contexts, based on the available cases, and offer direction on how it can be used to improve the performance of hydropower projects in World Bank client countries. This report also seeks to clarify the complementarity of the protocol with respect to World Bank policies and procedures and provide input as to the World Bank s role in the governance of the protocol. The lessons and recommendations presented in this report are based on a desk review of previous protocol assessments; consultation with World Bank staff; structured interviews with accredited assessors and developers from previous assessments; as well as direct observations during the pilot assessment of the Trung Son Hydropower Project in Vietnam.

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The Water-Energy-Food Nexus in the Middle East and North Africa: Scenarios for a Sustainable Future

2018-06, Borgomeo, Edoardo, Talbi, Amal, Wijnen, Marcus, Hejazi, Mohamad, Miralles-Wilhelm, Fernando

Water, energy, and agriculture have been conventionally dealt with separately in investment planning. For each of these sectors, regulatory frameworks, organizations, and infrastructures have been put in place to address sector-specific challenges and demands. As the Middle East and North Africa works towards building a more sustainable future, a nexus approach that considers the risks and synergies among these sectors is needed. To demonstrate the added value of a nexus approach, this report applies scenario analysis and integrated assessment modelling of the water-energy-food nexus to the Middle East and North Africa. The analysis finds that water scarcity increases in all countries in the region over the coming decades, mostly due to growing demands. More importantly, the analysis finds that many countries in the region could run out of fossil groundwater by 2050 unless measures to curb unsustainable abstraction are implemented. The impacts of growing scarcity on agriculture are significant, with production projected to drop by 60 by 2050 in some countries. On the upside, reducing the dependence of the agricultural and energy sectors on water and transitioning to renewable energies can reduce water scarcity, at the same time reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This report is targeted to policy makers, the academic community, and a wider global audience interested in exploring the interactions between water, agriculture, and energy.

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Wastewater: From Waste to Resource - The Case of Ridgewood, NJ, USA

2018-03, World Bank

: A set of case studies was prepared as part of the World Bank’s Water Global Practice initiative “Wastewater. Shifting paradigms: from waste to resource” to document existing experiences in the water sector on the topic. The case studies highlight innovative financing and contractual arrangements, innovative regulations and legislation and innovative project designs that promote integrated planning, resource recovery and that enhance the financial and environmental sustainability of wastewater treatment plants. This case study documents Ridgewood, New Jersey, USA.

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Applying Results-Based Financing in Water Investments

2014-05, Rodriguez, Diego, Suardi, Mario, Ham, Marcel, Mimmi, Luisa, Goksu, Amanda

Given the broad array of issues and the complexity faced by the water sector as a whole (from irrigation to flood protection, to water conservation and hydropower), there is great demand for future exploring the potential of RBF and tackling the questions still unanswered about many of its operational dimensions. This document takes a closer look at some of the practical aspects of implementing various RBF water schemes. Chapter 2 provides an analytical framework to explore if and when RBF can be a viable option, shedding light on some key factors and preconditions that are necessary for RBF to work--with the understanding that it can be used either as an alternative or a complement to a more traditional input-based funding scheme. Chapter 3 then revisits the concepts discussed in the analytical framework through the analysis of various case studies of RBF approaches in different water-related areas. Some of the case studies are based on actual projects already implemented or ongoing, while others are an illustrative elaboration, given the lack of practical cases to use as sources. Chapter 4 presents some conclusions and lessons learned. The key challenges that are likely to be encountered in designing an RBF scheme deal with: the clarity and level of certainty of the relationships from input to output to outcomes (causal links); the ease and availability of measurable indicators; and, consequently, the optimal determination of the necessary incentive(s) to align the goals of the principal with the agents' deliverables. Appendix A presents a glossary of RBF concepts and acronyms. Appendix B presents specific results and indicators which may be relevant for different sectors.