Miscellaneous Knowledge Notes

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  • Publication
    How to Identify Gender Gaps in Urban Forced Displacement: Guidance Note
    (Washington, DC, 2023-12-11) World Bank
    This Guidance Note offers comprehensive insights on how to conduct a gender gap analysis of the needs of displaced women and girls in situations of urban forced displacement. Addressing gender disparities is critical to the consolidation of peace and security. The 2024-2030 World Bank Group Gender Strategy commits the Bank to closing gender gaps in fragile and conflict-affected situations, which includes addressing women’s leadership, control over assets, access to employment, and social protection. The World Bank Strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence 2020-2025 also highlights the Bank’s role in mitigating the impacts of violent conflict and strengthening the resilience of the most vulnerable populations. Disaster risk management is crucial in urban areas, especially for displaced people living in informal communities. Therefore, the World Bank’s 2021-2025 Climate Change Action Plan is a critical component of a thorough gender gap analysis in urban settings.
  • Publication
    Violence against Women and Girls (VAWG): Disaster Risk Management Brief Second Edition
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2023-07-11) World Bank
    Disasters triggered by climate and other natural hazards are increasing in frequency, severity, and duration worldwide. Disasters, whether from natural hazards or man-made, cost lives and livelihoods, and do not have an equal effect on everyone. Women, girls, children, elderly people, persons with disabilities, and indigenous peoples,— especially in lower-income countries — are often disproportionately affected by disasters. Emerging evidence suggests that violence against women and girls (VAWG) increases in disaster settings. Managing the growing disaster risks associated with VAWG should therefore be integrated into all aspects of development. This brief, updating the previous DRM brief published in 2015, contains guidance on ethics and safety; resources for conducting a rapid situation analysis; specific ideas for implementation of policies and programs at the institutional, sectoral, and community levels at three stages (before, during and after the emergency); detailed examples of promising practices with a menu of indicators for use in monitoring and evaluation; and several active links to more-detailed resources and toolkits for working at the intersection of DRM and VAWG.
  • Publication
    Leadership Training Toolkit for State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs): Boards and Owners
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2021-06-30) World Bank; International Finance Corporation
    The Leadership Training Toolkit for State-Owned Enterprises (‘SOE Leadership Toolkit’) was developed jointly by the World Bank and IFC (World Bank Group) to support countries’ efforts to build capacity of State ownership entities, SOE boards, and SOE senior management. It addresses the growing need for curricula specifically adapted for SOEs, considering the significant role and impact of SOEs on public finances, the economy and delivery of public services. The SOE Leadership Toolkit is a global public good that can be used by different training providers, such as government training institutions, Institutes of Directors, corporate governance and ESG associations, and professional bodies or universities. It is designed to: • Advance corporate governance reforms by instilling in participants leadership values that can help them work within their companies or organizations to adopt the best practices • Foster a common understanding between state ownership and oversight entities and SOE leadership, by raising awareness of the respective roles and perspectives • Provide flexibility through a modular curriculum that allows a country and training institution to easily tailor programs to suit their specific context and target audience • Engage executive learners through experiential learning and interactive exercises, based on internationally recognized good practices and global priorities such as climate change and gender • Minimize training providers’ investment of time and resources for curriculum development by providing a comprehensive, standardized curriculum that includes handouts, and case studies The 15 training modules are structured in four parts. Each module includes specific topics, case studies and exercises. Cutting across these modules are four themes assuming an important place in today’s corporate governance landscape: 1) gender and diversity, 2) climate risk and resilience, 3) Maximizing Finance for Development, 4) corruption and integrity.
  • Publication
    Climate Change Institutional Assessment
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-04-14) World Bank
    Climate change poses particularly difficult challenges for public sector institutions. Climate change impacts all sectors of the economy and society. Action to address climate change requires coordination among multiple government and nongovernment actors. The extended time frame over which climate change unfolds requires a capability to plan, implement, and sustain a credible commitment to increasingly ambitious policies over multiple political cycles. There will be winners and losers. Policies may be contested. The Climate Change Institutional Assessment (CCIA) identifies the strengths and weaknesses of the institutional framework for addressing these climate change governance challenges. The audience for the assessment is officials of center-of-government agencies responsible for policy, planning, and finance, agencies with leading roles in climate change policy, and inter-ministerial climate change bodies.
  • Publication
    Screening Prospective Investors
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-03) UNCTAD; World Bank
    This note provides guidance to governments on how to screen and select prospective investment projects to ensure they maximize the social, economic, and environmental benefits while minimizing the risks. It provides investors information on what can be expected in cases of good screening practice. The acceptance of investors that later fail financially or have poor social and environmental outcomes has had damaging impacts on many countries as well as communities. Screening investors is a critical component of a country’s policy framework to mitigate those risks and to improve the likelihood that investments will have a positive effect on sustainable development priorities. This note summarizes available resources on how to screen agricultural investments and calls on donors, international organizations, and civil society to develop more. It is complemented by note 7: tools for screening investors, which provides a detailed toolkit that can be adapted to host countries’ individual circumstances.
  • Publication
    Healthy and Safe Working Environment
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-03) UNCTAD; World Bank
    This note provides guidance to investors and governments on good practice in occupational health and safety policies, programs, procedures and processes, a matter of critical importance given thathalf the world’s working population is in agriculture—one of the three most hazardous sectors, with an estimated 170,000 fatalities per year (ILO). To be successful, an agribusiness operationmust rely heavily not only on the skills and competencies of its employees but on their health and wellbeing, requiring an awareness of and adherence to acceptable occupational health and safety standards.
  • Publication
    Investment Contracts
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-03) UNCTAD; World Bank
    This note provides guidance on the form and content of contracts between investors and governments pertaining to agricultural investments. The best guarantee of positive benefits from foreign investment is a solid foundation of domestic laws that are properly enforced. In many developing countries, however, the necessary domestic laws may not be in place or may not be sufficiently detailed. Even when they are in place, they may not be implemented or enforced. Contracts can help fill the gaps in domestic laws by providing more detailed guidance on what should be contained in the assessments, and using international standards and best practice as the reference points. However, contracts need to be drafted carefully to maximize benefits and reduce risks.
  • Publication
    Monitoring Investments
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-03) UNCTAD; World Bank
    This note provides guidance on how to monitor the performance and impact of agricultural investments, and on which aspects to observe. Ongoing monitoring of investments is a key way to hold investors accountable for contractual commitments and deliver the expected benefits to the country and surrounding communities. It also facilitates early identification of emerging negative impacts or of failing investments, enabling remedial actions. Monitoring is often deficient because of a lack of resources and systematic procedures, which allows negative impacts to escalate beyond what will otherwise be the case. Internal monitoring is likewise good practice for investors and their financiers, though the field research indicated room for improvement.
  • Publication
    Public Transparency
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-03) UNCTAD; World Bank
    This note provides guidance on the type of information about agricultural investments that investors and governments can make publicly available. Transparency about certain aspects of investments can improve relations between investors and communities, enable external stakeholders to hold investors to commitments, and improve investors’ public image. Although some information should be kept private to protect commercial interests, in general the amount of publicly available information is insufficient for transparent, accountable conduct of agricultural investments. This has often led to fear, mistrust, and resentment, and created operational and financial difficulties for investors. Some investors and governments have recently shifted toward a more transparent approach, but the risk of misuse of information needs to be managed.
  • Publication
    Grievance Redress Mechanisms
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-03) UNCTAD; World Bank
    This note provides guidance on how investors can provide effective remedies to affected parties who perceive that their rights have been adversely affected by business activities. A grievance redress mechanism (GRM) is a set of arrangements that enable local communities, employees, out growers, and other affected stakeholders to raise grievances with the investor and seek redress when they perceive a negative impact arising from the investor’s activities. It is a key way to mitigate, manage, and resolve potential or realized negative impacts, as well as fulfill obligations under international human rights law and contribute to positive relations with communities and employees. GRMs have been operated with varying degrees of success. This noteprovides guidance and examples on how to improve the design and implementation of mechanisms for mutual benefit.