Miscellaneous Knowledge Notes

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    Social Assistance Programs and Household Welfare in Eswatini: Study Brief
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-12-17) World Bank
    This study brief on “Social Assistance Programs and Household Welfare in Eswatini” examines the performance of Eswatini’s main social assistance programs. These programs employ varying combinations of categorical and self-targeting to reach the poor and vulnerable.
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    COVID-10 Impact Monitoring: Malawi, Round 12
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-09) World Bank
    In May 2020, the National Statistical Office (NSO), with support from the World Bank, launched the High-Frequency Phone Survey on COVID-19 (coronavirus), which tracks the socio-economic impacts of the pandemic on a monthly basis for a period of 12 months. The survey aimed to recontact the entire sample of households that had been interviewed during the Integrated Household Panel Survey (IHPS) 2019 round and that had a phone number for at least one household member or a reference individual. This report presents the findings from the twelfth round of the survey that was conducted during the period of June 14 - June 30, 2021.
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    COVID-19 Impact Monitoring: Malawi, Round 11
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-07) World Bank
    The COVID-19 pandemic has socio-economic impacts on Malawians and there is need for timely data to monitor these impacts and support response efforts to the pandemic. In May 2020, the National Statistical Office (NSO), with support from the World Bank, launched the High Frequency Phone Survey on COVID-19; a monthly survey of a nationally representative sample of households previously interviewed as part of the Malawi Integrated Household Panel Survey to monitor the economic impact of the pandemic and other shocks. This brief presents the findings from the tenth and eleventh rounds of the Malawi High-Frequency Phone Sur-vey on COVID-19 (HFPS COVID-19) conducted between the 29th of April and the 9th of June 2021.
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    Are Communities Receiving Appropriate Care?: A Study on the Community Health Worker Program in Mozambique
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-06) World Bank
    Community involvement in promoting and providing health services is one of the principles underpinning the Mozambique Health sector strategic plan (2014–2024) and the investment case. Community-based health services in Mozambique are primarily provided through the community health workers or Agentes Polivalentes Elementares (APEs). Existing since 1974, the Ministry of Health (MOH) revitalized its APE program in 2010 after setbacks encountered during the civil war (1976–1992). The revitalized program, led by the Department of Health Promotion under the National Directorate of Public Health, seeks to increase the coverage and the quality of services provided, aiming to train and deploy additional APEs across the country, with a primary role in health promotion and disease prevention and a secondary role in curative services. This study seeks to assess the quality of care (QoC) provided by APEs to inform policymaking for the APE program from an evidence-based perspective.
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    COVID-19 Impact Monitoring: Malawi, Round 9
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-06) World Bank
    In May 2020, the National Statistical Office (NSO), with support from the World Bank, launched the High-Frequency Phone Survey on COVID-19, which tracks the socio-economic impacts of the pandemic on a monthly basis for a period of 12 months. The survey aimed to recontact the entire sample of households that had been interviewed during the Integrated Household Panel Survey (IHPS) 2019 round and that had a phone number for at least one household member or a reference individual. This report presents the findings from the ninth round of the survey that was conducted during the period of April 07 - April 23, 2021.
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    Harnessing Momentum: Priority Areas of Intervention to Further Strengthen Malawi’s Health Sector
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2020-11) World Bank
    Malawians are healthier and live longer than they ever have. Achieving universal health coverage in a sustainable and equitable way is the main goal of Malawi’s health sector reform plan, and an essential health package (EHP) free at the point of use is the government’s primary tool to achieve this. Malnutrition also remains an ongoing challenge. Malawi’s Second Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSP) for 2017-2022, identifies a set of interventions necessary to further improve health outcomes, and to ensure the delivery of quality, equitable, affordable and patient-centred health care services. Malawi’s 2018-2019 Harmonised Health Facility Assessment (HHFA), conducted by the government of Malawi with support from international health and development agencies, provides a comprehensive including government, faith-based, CHAM (Christian Health Association of Malawi) and private for-profit facilities between November 2018 and March 2019. This policy brief draws from this assessment, as well other research, identifying the most important policy interventions needed to achieve key health targets over the coming years.
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    Innovation in Education: Improving Learning Outcomes through ICT Technology
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2020-06-24) World Bank
    Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa identify technology as a viable complementary tool to improve learning outcomes in primary and secondary education. New research evidence from The Gambia suggests that a student-centered computer-assisted learning (CAL) program significantly improves student performance and teaching effectiveness in secondary schools. Policy action to complement traditional pedagogical methods with interactive technology in classrooms can help countries translate their gains in access to education into greater achievements in learning and skills.
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    The Impact of COVID-19 on Workers in Hawassa Industrial Park
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2020-06-03) World Bank
    As part of the World Bank Group’s analytical work program on More, better, and more inclusive jobs: Preparing for successful industrialization in Ethiopia (funded by the UK Department for International Development), a team of researchers led by Morgan Hardy (New York University Abu Dhabi) and Christian Johannes Meyer (University of Oxford) is deploying high-frequency phone surveys on a representative sample of garment factory workers in Hawassa Industrial Park (HIP) to document how their lives are changing during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis. This Rapid Briefing Note reports the preliminary baseline results from 3,163 female respondents, summarizing the more detailed “Living Paper” written by the team of researchers. The data collection took place between April 28 and May 26, 2020.
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    Rethinking Electrification in Sub-Saharan Africa: Why we Should Stop Counting and Start Thinking Big
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2019) World Bank
    If African nations want to see their economies transform, the issue of electricity must be tackled head-on. Expansion needs investment too, and for that, utilities must recover their costs. Yet all over the region utilities are running at a loss. This report takes a broader look at the issue to show that the problem in Africa is not power but poverty. It shows that affordability, reliability, and coordination are the missing links to making utilities financially viable and expanding their consumer base. The report emphasizes that access to electricity cannot be a stand-alone goal. Policymakers must rethink their approach to electrification by placing the productive use of electrification at center stage. Given the resource constraints, governments need to coordinate investments in other aspects of their infrastructure at the same time as they invest in electricity. Policies and programs need to focus on improving access to markets through better roads and expanding credit for new businesses. In this way, electricity can energize agriculture in rural areas and industry in urban areas. This report shows that, to generate income, create jobs, and alleviate poverty in Africa, electricity has to be part of a package.
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    Systems in Action: Tanzania
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2015-11) World Bank
    Education systems are large, complex organizations that encompass not only various sets of actors and inputs, but also the relationships that allow those actors and units to work together. When standards, rules, accountability relationships and financing levels are aligned towards shared education goals, the education system as a whole, in all its complexity and size, is coherent and able to perform well. Improving learning outcomes therefore requires much more than simply increasing resources; education systems must be strengthened at the component and the system level, to help equip children, youth and adults with knowledge and skills for life. The World Bank helps countries ensure ‘learning for all’ through support to countries on both the financing and knowledge fronts. The Education Global Practice within the World Bank champions a systems approach, by holistically evaluating which education policies and programs are most likely to create quality learning environments and improve student performance, especially among the disadvantaged and excluded.