Other Infrastructure Study

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Egypt: Enabling Private Investment and Commercial Financing in Infrastructure

2018-12-01, World Bank Group

In 2016 the Government of Egypt (GoE) has embarked on an ambitious and much needed transition towards a better economic policy. While the macroeconomic stability and market confidence have been largely restored, the overall fiscal situation remains challenging. With limited fiscal space, solely relying on public resources to fund infrastructure investments, will no longer be a viable strategy to meet the country's needs. Building on the success of attracting private investment in renewables and natural gas sector, there is significant potential for replicating the success across other infrastructure sectors. Egypt has recognized that in order to raise competitiveness, increase investments in human capital, and sustain the benefits of the homegrown reform; it will need to continuously shift its development model towards creating an enabling environment for the private sector to invest more, export more and generate more jobs. Starting with Energy, Transport, Water and Sanitation and Agriculture, this report highlights the tremendous potential and opportunities available in each of these sectors. Additionally, it also presents a roadmap for sectoral transformation, whilst highlighting the cross-cutting enabling and functional activities required to facilitate this transition.

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Resilient Water Supply and Sanitation Services: The Case of Japan

2018-01, World Bank

Natural disasters have increasingly damaged water supply and sanitation (WSS) facilities and infrastructure, leaving entire communities without safe and reliable drinking water and the appropriate disposal of wastewater. These emergency events could arise from inundation of facilities, loss of electricity, and exposure and disruption of infrastructures. Less severe impacts can arise from increased siltation of reservoirs and slow-onset events such as droughts, thus having longer-term effects on the resilience and reliability of services. These WSS service failures or interruptions could set off a cascading effect across interconnected infrastructure systems including public health and fire services, which in turn could pose both direct and indirect economic impacts. Japan has built the resilience of its WSS services through an adaptive management approach based on lessons learned from past natural disasters. This experience offers key insights for low- and middle-income countries seeking to sustain and build resilience of WSS services.

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Leveraging Technology to Support Construction Regulation and Permitting Reform: Insights from Recent Country Experience

2018-06, Molfetas, Aris, Wille, John

Good regulations, combined with sound enforcement mechanisms and an efficient, transparent, and affordable permitting process, can ensure safety standards for the community, facilitate investment in new building stock, and contribute to capital formation. A recent study shows that long delays in obtaining permits can lead to higher transaction costs and fewer transactions. Similarly, an earlier study in the United States (US) found that accelerating permit approvals by 3 months in a 22-month project cycle could increase construction spending and property tax revenue. Unpredictable, lengthy, and expensive permitting procedures influence entrepreneurs' decision making. A recent competitiveness report on the US, for example, found that construction costs and the permitting process were among the top 20 factors in determining the location of a start-up. Given the relevance of this area for both communities and investors, governments have sought to leverage technology to enhance permitting service delivery and improve availability of zoning requirements and building regulatory information.

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Mobilizing Private Finance for Development in Latin America and the Caribbean

2018-02, Abousleiman, Issam A., Thompson Araujo, Jorge, Abousleiman, Issam A., Thompson Araujo, Jorge

The Latin America and the Caribbean Region (LAC) has the largest stock of active PPP investments and the largest pipeline of infrastructure projects by volume globally, reflecting the central role of the private sector in the regional development agenda. Looking ahead, the region is making efforts to close the estimated US$180 billion per year investment gap with further private sector resources by: (i) improving the enabling environment for private investments to take place; and (ii) developing a robust pipeline of bankable projects. The WBG is well-placed to assist the region with financial support and knowledge services, as illustrated by the examples selected for part three of this report.