Other Infrastructure Study

349 items available

Permanent URI for this collection

Items in this collection

Now showing 1 - 10 of 10
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Integrating Resilience into Municipal Infrastructure Delivery in Kenya: Guidance Note for Municipal and County Engineer and Planners - Urban Resilient Infrastructure Guideline

2023-09-01, World Bank

This Resilient Urban Infrastructure Guidelines forms one of a suite of reports developed by AECOM for the World Bank Group under the ‘Enhancement of Resilient Urban Planning and Infrastructure Investments in Urban Areas in Kenya’ assignment and constitutes Deliverable 2. This guidance note provides simple guidance for increasing the resilience of municipal infrastructure projects, and of communities, to physical risks, notably impacts of climate changes. This will increase the sustainability of investments under Second Kenya Urban Support Program (KUSP2), enabling them to perform their required function for their proposed design life, in a changing climate. It follows, roughly chronologically, the project development and design process. For the purposes of this note, resilient urban infrastructure is defined as infrastructure that is designed to deliver essential services now and in the future. It is prepared for and can withstand, adapt and recover positively from the physical (and climatic) shocks and stresses it may face over its lifetime. This is both with regards to the assets themselves, as well as the wider system that these assets are part of, which could include: the natural environment, the urban system, the operators, and the communities that interact with them.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Linking Up: Public-Private Partnerships in Power Transmission in Africa

2017-06-06, World Bank Group

The 'Linking up: Public-Private Partnerships in Power Transmission in Africa' report examines private sector-led investments in transmission globally and how this approach is applicable in sub-Saharan Africa. The private sector has invested over US$25 billion in the generation sector in Africa, and across other regions, has also participated successfully in transmission networks in many countries in Latin America and Asia. In these regions, private sector participation has reduced project costs and expanded coverage. The report draws lessons from case studies and highlights what regulations and other factors are needed to attract private sector interest in transmission projects.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Towards a Water-Secure Kenya : Water Resources Sector Memorandum

2004-04, World Bank

The main objective of the Water Resources Sector Memorandum (WRSM) is to capture the emerging water resources management priorities and to propose a plan of action that will put water resources management on a sound footing in Kenya. It will also guide the engagement of development partners who are formulating programs for supporting reforms and investments in water resources management and development. The WRSM provides an economic rationale for extending the water resources reforms being undertaken by the Government of Kenya and highlights the need to broaden the ownership of the reforms to include other sectoral ministries, NGOs, the private sector, and community groups. It broadens and complements the analyses of water issues in the Country Economic Memorandum (CEM) and will inform the Country Assistance Strategy (CAS).

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Kenya : Transport Sector Memorandum, Volume 1. Strategy

2003-01, World Bank

This Memorandum is intended to initiate discussion regarding the appropriate infrastructure strategy and policy direction which will lead to a sustainable transport sector which provides access for people and goods within Kenya and integrates Kenya into the global economy. Unless these two objectives are achieved, the prospects for substantial and continuing social and economic development in Kenya are limired. Large segments of Kenya's population will remain isolated in the rural areas, and the economy will continue as a producer of primary commodities and basic manufactues for domestic and perhaps regional consumption. The report states as the first and most important action to reverse the deterioration in the transport sector, a very major change in the philosophic approach of politicians to the sector is needed. They have to start to treat infrastructure as integral to the economic rather than the political process. Beyond this overarching change in approach, the following should also be considered as needed steps for implementing the strategy: increase private sector investment and management in the ports, airports, railways, and roads systems; reduce the role of the public sector in day-to-day management while retaining core functions for all modes of transportation and increasing public funding; and in terms of financing, rely on performance contracting under either maintenance concessions or long-term performance-based contracts.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Enhancement of Resilient Urban Planning and Infrastructure Investments in Urban Areas in Kenya - Guidance Note on Mainstreaming Resilience into Urban Planning

2023-09-01, World Bank

This ‘Guidance Note on Mainstreaming Resilience into Urban Planning’ forms one of a suite of reports developed by AECOM for the World Bank Group under the ‘Enhancement of Resilient Urban Planning and Infrastructure Investments in Urban Areas in Kenya’ assignment and constitutes Deliverable 7. Aimed at municipal-level planners in Kenya, this guidance note includes activities, considerations, and examples of good practice from within Kenya and other contexts to support municipal governments with mainstreaming resilience within the urban planning system. While the primary audience is municipal-level urban planners, this guidance note is likely to be helpful and relevant to other planning system stakeholders, including developers, local politicians, government ministries, departments and agencies, community leaders, other built environmental professionals, and the general public. Throughout, the Guidance Note focusses on mainstreaming resilience. In other words, this document is not, and should not be used as, a general ‘how-to’ guide for urban planning. While some advice is provided within it that may be more applicable beyond the topic of resilience and/or comprises basic good practice in urban planning, that text is nevertheless included as a means to build resilience as a primary outcome.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Towards a Strategic Analysis of Water Resources Investments in Kenya : Hydrological, Economic, and Institutional Assessment for Storage Development

2011-06-30, World Bank

The objective of this study was to advance the process of prioritizing water storage investments that could reduce water stress in economically important areas. The specific objectives of the study were to (i) outline a comprehensive framework for screening of potential storage sites; (ii) identify important water stressed areas through an updated water balance; (iii) assess alternative multipurpose water storage projects through physical, hydrological and economic criteria; and (iv) analyze institutional and financing aspects of water resources development in Kenya to identify capacity and knowledge inadequacies. The study focused on identifying viable surface water storage projects to increase water supply reliability and mitigate the effects of common multi-year droughts. No new estimates of groundwater resources were made, though they were considered in quantifying overall water availability. The scope of the study was limited to an initial screening of infrastructure options that will increase the reliability of water supply. The state of water service delivery was not assessed as it was outside the scope of this study.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Kenya : Transport Sector Memorandum, Volume 3. Annexes

2003-01-31, World Bank

This Memorandum is intended to initiate discussion regarding the appropriate infrastructure strategy and policy direction which will lead to a sustainable transport sector which provides access for people and goods within Kenya and integrates Kenya into the global economy. Unless these two objectives are achieved, the prospects for substantial and continuing social and economic development in Kenya are limired. Large segments of Kenya's population will remain isolated in the rural areas, and the economy will continue as a producer of primary commodities and basic manufactues for domestic and perhaps regional consumption. The report states as the first and most important action to reverse the deterioration in the transport sector, a very major change in the philosophic approach of politicians to the sector is needed. They have to start to treat infrastructure as integral to the economic rather than the political process. Beyond this overarching change in approach, the following should also be considered as needed steps for implementing the strategy: increase private sector investment and management in the ports, airports, railways, and roads systems; reduce the role of the public sector in day-to-day management while retaining core functions for all modes of transportation and increasing public funding; and in terms of financing, rely on performance contracting under either maintenance concessions or long-term performance-based contracts.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Managing Risks for a Safer Built Environment in Malawi: Building Regulatory Capacity Assessment

2019-06, World Bank Group

In a rapidly urbanising world, Malawi remains one of the least urbanised countries in Africa. Approximately 16.7 percent of Malawi's population live in urban areas. Nevertheless, the country is urbanising at a moderate rate of approximately 3.7–3.9 percent per year. If growth continues at this rate, by 2030, approximately 20 percent of the population will be city dwellers, reaching 30 percent in 2050. This urban growth has the potential to improve economic opportunities and living conditions across Malawi. This is particularly significant given that approximately 69 percent of the population are living under the international poverty line of 1.9 US Dollars/day in purchasing power parity terms. However, challenges are also associated with this shift and concentration of population. With urbanisation comes a substantial amount of new construction. In Malawi, much of this new construction has occurred in cities and towns with limited capacity to ensure the structures in which people live, work and gather are safely sited and built to withstand chronic stresses (i.e. fire and spontaneous collapse) and disaster shocks (i.e. earthquakes and floods). In Lilongwe, for example, estimates indicate that 76 percent of residents live in informal settlements. These settlements are generally characterised by a lack of access to publicservices, tenure insecurity and inadequate housing. Malawi is impacted by a wide range of hazards, particularly droughts, floods, landslides, wildfires and earthquakes. Malawi is also vulnerable to recurrent and chronic risks. Large building fires in recent years include the LL and Mchinji Markets and the Mulanje Bus Depot in 2016 and the Area 13 and Zomba Market in 2018. In many ways, Malawi is at a crossroads: the regulatory decisions made now will significantly impact the longterm safety, productivity and resilience of the built environment in rural and urban areas. With its low base and moderate rate of urbanisation, Malawi is wellpositioned to formulate plans to maximise the benefits and to manage the challenges of urban agglomeration.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Water Supply and Sanitation in Kenya : Turning Finance into Services for 2015 and Beyond

2011, World Bank

The architecture of the water supply and sanitation subsectors in Kenya has undergone significant change in the last decade, in response to a slow deterioration of urban services through the 1980s and '90s. Initiated with a new water act in 2002, significant policy revision and restructuring of institutional roles is still ongoing and will need to be aligned with the new Constitution of Kenya 2010. Most of the reform emphasis has been in the water supply subsectors, especially urban, but sanitation is now regaining emphasis with a new policy published in 2007 and a strategy and investment plan in development. These reforms of the enabling environment are beginning to yield impacts in the coverage and quality of services. Kenya's challenge is to finalize the reform of enabling aspects such as strategies and investment plans, further clarifying roles and responsibilities, at the same time as significantly scaling up resources and systems for implementing the development of new services on the ground. Finally, in terms of checks and balances, while the monitoring and evaluation architecture is elaborate, greater use of the findings captured by information systems and reports is needed to drive performance improvements. The African Ministers Council on Water (AMCOW) Second Country Status Overview (CSO2) has been produced in collaboration with the Government of Kenya and other stakeholders.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Kenya : Transport Sector Memorandum, Volume 2. Sector Papers

2003-01, World Bank

This Memorandum is intended to initiate discussion regarding the appropriate infrastructure strategy and policy direction which will lead to a sustainable transport sector which provides access for people and goods within Kenya and integrates Kenya into the global economy. Unless these two objectives are achieved, the prospects for substantial and continuing social and economic development in Kenya are limired. Large segments of Kenya's population will remain isolated in the rural areas, and the economy will continue as a producer of primary commodities and basic manufactues for domestic and perhaps regional consumption. The report states as the first and most important action to reverse the deterioration in the transport sector, a very major change in the philosophic approach of politicians to the sector is needed. They have to start to treat infrastructure as integral to the economic rather than the political process. Beyond this overarching change in approach, the following should also be considered as needed steps for implementing the strategy: increase private sector investment and management in the ports, airports, railways, and roads systems; reduce the role of the public sector in day-to-day management while retaining core functions for all modes of transportation and increasing public funding; and in terms of financing, rely on performance contracting under either maintenance concessions or long-term performance-based contracts.