Other Infrastructure Study

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  • Publication
    Road Geohazard Risk Management Handbook
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2020-10) Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery
    This handbook outlines an approach to proactively manage the risks of geohazards on roads, road users, and the people living near and affected by road. This handbook is structured to support road geohazard risk management sequentially and systematically: Part I, Framework for Road Geohazard Risk Management, helps users understand the framework for road geohazard risk management, introduces some basic concepts, and provides context to the overall handbook; Part II, Institutional Capacity and Coordination, covers the institutional arrangements that are necessary for the successful implementation of geohazard management; Part III, Systems Planning, covers the systems planning aspects, pertaining to the identification, assessment, and evaluation of risks, along with raising awareness of disasters; Part IV, Engineering and Design, deals with the engineered solutions to address geohazard risks, giving examples of different solutions to particular risk types; Part V, Operations and Maintenance, focuses on the operations and maintenance aspects of geohazard management whether the maintenance of previously engineered solutions or the nonengineered solutions available to mitigate the impacts of geohazard risks; Part VI, Contingency Planning, addresses contingency programming issues, such as postdisaster response and recovery, and the important issue of funding arrangements; and Part VII, References and Resource Materials, contains the reference list and additional online resources. Additionally, this handbook includes standard templates for terms of reference (ToRs) that can be adapted for technical assistance projects for road geohazard risk management (see Appendix A) and an operation manual (OM) for the practitioners involved with road geohazard risk management (see Appendix B).
  • Publication
    Improving Climate Resilience of Federal Road Network in Brazil
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2019-05) World Bank
    Although Brazil is the fifth largest country in the world, it has a relatively low number of natural hazards. However, its exposure to natural hazards has increased relative to other countries because of insufficient preventive actions in the past, resulting in more damage from natural hazards to both infrastructure and human lives than countries of comparable size would incur. Brazil faces an increasing risk of natural disasters, in particular floods and landslides. The objective of the study is to strengthen capacity of geohazard disaster resilience of federal highway infrastructure in Brazil through reviewing disaster risk management (DRM) capacity for federal road infrastructure and case studies of applying innovative methodologies for assessing disaster risk and evaluating economic benefits of resilience countermeasures. Although floods and landslides are the most recurrent natural disasters in Brazil, this report focuses on the latter, leaving floods for future studies. This report carefully describes how three innovative methodologies that, if properly applied, could improve the effectiveness of landslide risk management, thus reducing economic and human impacts. The report begins with diagnostics of the institutional capacities of geohazard risk management at the federal government level in Brazil. Chapters 1 and 2 include the backgrounds of natural disasters, road systems, and geohazards on roads in Brazil and a review of the road geohazard risk management with overviews of the following areas: institutional capacity and coordination, system planning, engineering designs, operation and maintenance, nonstructural measures, and contingency programming. Then, Chapters 3 and 4 describe the case study of application of the three innovative DRM assessment methodologies. Finally, Chapter 5 shows the suggestions and recommendations for the next steps.
  • Publication
    Mobilizing Private Finance for Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-02) Abousleiman, Issam A.; Thompson Araujo, Jorge; Abousleiman, Issam A.; Thompson Araujo, Jorge
    The Latin America and the Caribbean Region (LAC) has the largest stock of active PPP investments and the largest pipeline of infrastructure projects by volume globally, reflecting the central role of the private sector in the regional development agenda. Looking ahead, the region is making efforts to close the estimated US$180 billion per year investment gap with further private sector resources by: (i) improving the enabling environment for private investments to take place; and (ii) developing a robust pipeline of bankable projects. The WBG is well-placed to assist the region with financial support and knowledge services, as illustrated by the examples selected for part three of this report.
  • Publication
    Back to Planning: How to Close Brazil's Infrastructure Gap in Times of Austerity
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2017-07-12) Raiser, Martin; Procee, Paul; Briceno-Garmendia, Cecilia; Kikoni, Edith; Kizito, Joseph; Vinuela, Lorena
    Why does Brazil continue to lag its peers in the quality of physical infrastructure? What are the implications for growth prospects? What could be done to close the infrastructure gap? These are the key questions addressed in this new report on infrastructure in Brazil. The key argument of the report is that Brazil needs to improve its capacity to plan and prioritize its infrastructure investments. Poorly prioritized and prepared infrastructure investments are a key reason why successive government programs, often with significant budget allocations, have had limited impact. Insufficient planning efforts have meant that what investment takes place has done little to reduce glaring inefficiencies and losses. With more efforts upstream to prepare a robust pipeline of projects, Brazil is in an excellent position to attract commercial financing to its infrastructure. With more attention to sector planning and governance, losses could be reduced and the effective resources available to infrastructure could be roughly doubled. This in turn would help boost growth and improve the quality of public services without the need for much additional public money. The report analyzes recent government measures such as the creation of the PPI and develops recommendations how infrastructure can become an engine of economic recovery in Brazil.
  • Publication
    Federative Republic of Brazil iRAP Pilot Technical Report: Federal Highways
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2016-01) World Bank
    As part of efforts to curb road deaths and serious injuries, the World Bank Global Road Safety Facility (GRSF) invited the International Road Assessment Programme (iRAP) to work with the National Department of Transport Infrastructure (Departamento Nacional de Infraestrutura de Transportes, DNIT) to assess the safety of Brazilian roads. During this second assessment of Brazilian roads, approximately 3,400km of roads were assessed. This technical report describes the road assessment project and includes details on data collection, the methodology used and a summary of the results. The infrastructure-related risk assessment involved detailed surveys and coding of 50 road attributes at 100 meter intervals along the network and creation of Star Ratings, which provide a simple and objective measure showing the level of risk on the road network. The star ratings show that 1 percent of road length is rated as 5-star, 9 percent is rated as 4-star, 58 percent is rated as 3-star, and the remaining 32 percent is rated as 2-star and below for vehicle occupants. For motorcyclists, no roads were rated as 5-star, only 3 percent of road length is rated as 4-star, 47 percent is rated as 3-star, and the remaining 50 percent is rated 2-star and below. For pedestrians less than 1 percent is rated as 4-star and 5-star, 2 percent is rated as 3-star and the remaining 13 percent is rated 2-star and below. For bicyclists less than 1 percent is rated as 5-star or 4-star, 5 percent is rated as 3-star and the remaining 14 percent is rated 2-star and below. The project also involved the creation of a Safer Roads Investment Plans, which draws on more than 90 proven road safety treatments, ranging from low cost road markings and pedestrian refuges to higher cost intersection upgrades and full highway duplication.
  • Publication
    Brazil - São Paulo : Inputs for a Sustainable Competitive City Strategy, Volume 2. Background Report
    (Washington, DC, 2007-03) World Bank
    Through an analysis of selected topics, this study aims to offer inputs for a successful recovery strategy for the city and the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo (MSRP) in Brazil. The study first presents an analysis of the underlying factors of the economic transition in the MRSP, highlighting the factors behind the recent performance of the MRSP in terms of job creation and growth. Then, four inputs that would lead to a 'recovery strategy' for the MRSP are discussed in detail: The key area in the recovery strategy is 'Improving Fiscal Performance and Creditworthiness.' This is discussed in Chapter 2 and it provides an assessment of the current fiscal situation, revising the fiscal scenario, and the links between economic performance and fiscal spending. A second area of focus within the recovery strategy is 'Improving Competitiveness and the Investment Climate.' Chapter 3 assesses this issue along with the business environment in the MRSP, using both direct surveys and econometric models. A third area of focus under the MRSP recovery strategy is 'Improving Institutional Partnerships.' Chapter 4 explains this issue as confusing institutional framework; overlapping responsibilities, the lack of coordination across government levels, and little interaction with the private sector have hampered the MRSP's ability to react to economic and fiscal shocks. Finally, 'Improving Service Delivery' is the fourth focus area within the MRSP recovery strategy and is covered in chapter 5. The challenges of service delivery are illustrated in this chapter through careful examination of housing policies and programs in the Municipality of Sao Paulo.
  • Publication
    São Paulo - Inputs for a Sustainable Competitive City Strategy : Volume 1. Main Report
    (Washington, DC, 2007-03) World Bank
    Through an analysis of selected topics, this study aims to offer inputs for a successful recovery strategy for the city and the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo (MSRP) in Brazil. The study first presents an analysis of the underlying factors of the economic transition in the MRSP, highlighting the factors behind the recent performance of the MRSP in terms of job creation and growth. Then, four inputs that would lead to a 'recovery strategy' for the MRSP are discussed in detail: The key area in the recovery strategy is 'Improving Fiscal Performance and Creditworthiness.' This is discussed in Chapter 2 and it provides an assessment of the current fiscal situation, revising the fiscal scenario, and the links between economic performance and fiscal spending. A second area of focus within the recovery strategy is 'Improving Competitiveness and the Investment Climate.' Chapter 3 assesses this issue along with the business environment in the MRSP, using both direct surveys and econometric models. A third area of focus under the MRSP recovery strategy is 'Improving Institutional Partnerships.' Chapter 4 explains this issue as confusing institutional framework; overlapping responsibilities, the lack of coordination across government levels, and little interaction with the private sector have hampered the MRSP's ability to react to economic and fiscal shocks. Finally, 'Improving Service Delivery' is the fourth focus area within the MRSP recovery strategy and is covered in chapter 5. The challenges of service delivery are illustrated in this chapter through careful examination of housing policies and programs in the Municipality of Sao Paulo.