Other Infrastructure Study

341 items available

Permanent URI for this collection

Items in this collection

Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    Colombia : Inputs for Sub-Regional Competitiveness Policies
    (Washington, DC, 2008-06) World Bank
    In recent years, the Government of Colombia (GoC) has placed a high priority on competitiveness. Increasing globalization trends and Colombia's decision to increase trade integration, with the negotiation of a free trade agreement (FTA) with the US, has led the government to focus on a complementary agenda to boost competitiveness in order to reap the benefits of increased trade integration. A bottom-up process of consultation, known as the Domestic Agenda, was launched with the aims of identifying key constraints at the local and sector levels and developing a set of competitiveness-oriented measures. This study aims at helping the GoC to fine-tune the mix of policies and actions to assist its regions in meeting development challenges and grasping opportunities from trade liberalization. Defining competitiveness as policies and actions to increase total factor productivity (TFP), this report seeks to provide inputs for the establishment of a strategy for sub regional competitiveness and growth through both examining the recent literature on the main instruments directed towards these objectives and evaluating sub-regional endowments, capacity, productive structure and the determinants of productivity levels in selected regions of Colombia. Three key areas for competitiveness are further explored: (a) overall investment climate; (b) infrastructure and logistics; and (c) human capital and innovation.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    Colombia - Recent Economic Developments in Infrastructure : Balancing Social and Productive Needs for Infrastructure, Volume 2. Main Report
    (Washington, DC, 2004-11-01) World Bank
    The purpose of this study is to provide an integral evaluation of recent economic developments in Colombia's infrastructure sectors. Specifically, the study covers the electricity, natural gas, telecommunications, water, and transport sectors. Colombia presents high levels of access to basic household services compared to its Latin American peers, while access to services in the country is relatively equitable across the income spectrum, but relatively inequitable between urban and rural areas. However, Colombia lags behind its peers as regards paved roads, internet access, and electricity generation capacity. Energy use is strongly driven by the underlying structure of the economy, and paved road density is driven by the internal spatial distribution of economic activity. Moreover, there is mixed evidence as to the relative quality, and efficiency of Colombia's infrastructure service providers. The report stipulates Colombia needs to enhance its performance on productive infrastructure, while preserving its achievements in the social sphere. On the basis of this comparative assessment, the challenge for Colombia would appear to lie primarily in reorienting its infrastructure investments towards the productive sectors, without jeopardizing its strong performance in social infrastructure. While the private sector can play an important role in addressing the deficits in energy and telecommunications, the key challenge of financing improvements in the road network will necessarily remain a predominantly public responsibility, given that the limited scope for toll roads has already been largely exploited.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    Colombia - Recent Economic Developments in Infrastructure : Balancing Social and Productive Needs for Infrastructure, Volume 1. Executive Summary
    (Washington, DC, 2004-11-01) World Bank
    The purpose of this study is to provide an integral evaluation of recent economic developments in Colombia's infrastructure sectors. Specifically, the study covers the electricity, natural gas, telecommunications, water, and transport sectors. Colombia presents high levels of access to basic household services compared to its Latin American peers, while access to services in the country is relatively equitable across the income spectrum, but relatively inequitable between urban and rural areas. However, Colombia lags behind its peers as regards paved roads, internet access, and electricity generation capacity. Energy use is strongly driven by the underlying structure of the economy, and paved road density is driven by the internal spatial distribution of economic activity. Moreover, there is mixed evidence as to the relative quality, and efficiency of Colombia's infrastructure service providers. The report stipulates Colombia needs to enhance its performance on productive infrastructure, while preserving its achievements in the social sphere. On the basis of this comparative assessment, the challenge for Colombia would appear to lie primarily in reorienting its infrastructure investments towards the productive sectors, without jeopardizing its strong performance in social infrastructure. While the private sector can play an important role in addressing the deficits in energy and telecommunications, the key challenge of financing improvements in the road network will necessarily remain a predominantly public responsibility, given that the limited scope for toll roads has already been largely exploited.