D. Speeches by Paul Wolfowitz (2005-07)

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Paul Wolfowitz served as 10th President of the World Bank Group from 2005 to 2007.

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  • Publication
    Why Africa Matters to Americans
    (2006-12-10) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, talked about a new generation of leaders emerging in Africa, who increasingly recognize their responsibility to their people. The landscape across Africa is changing. Conflicts diminish. Small Businesses emerge. We are seeing a new breath of hope infused in all parts of that continent. More and more Africans are saying they can’t live with corruption. Strong U.S. support for foreign aid is particularly important to help address issues important to Americans, issues like government transparency, anti-corruption, and civil society participation. Wolfowitz concluded that it will be up to Africans most of all to bring about the momentous changes needed to conquer poverty. But as Americans we must be able to say that we did everything we could to give them the hand that they need and deserve.
  • Publication
    Remarks at Meeting on 'Sustaining Treatment Costs--Who Will Pay?'
    (2006-11-27) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, at a meeting jointly sponsored by WHO, UNAIDS, and the World Bank, addressed the issue of the financial sustainability of AIDS treatment—especially focusing on the increasing need for second-line combination treatment regimens. The Bank is working to strengthen capacity for effectively mainstreaming AIDS priorities into national planning efforts, particularly development of poverty reduction and implementation processes. As one of many development partners supporting national AIDS programs, the World Bank is committed to improve coordination, and to better align and harmonize its support with country responses.
  • Publication
    Cities at the Front Lines of Development
    (2006-02-09) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, stated that the importance of cities is increasing on a daily basis. By 2030, China alone will add 342 million new urban residents, and India 271 million. Africa will add 395 million people and more than half (54 percent) of its population will be living in urban areas. Urbanization creates job opportunities and poverty challenges. Urbanization has place mayors on center stage to implement solutions to alleviate poverty at the local level. The World Bank established a dedicated urban unit more than 30 years ago, with estimated lending on urban issues in 2005 at $7 billion. The Bank looks forward to strengthening partnerships with local governments.
  • Publication
    China a Model Country
    (2005-10-14) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, noted that China has shown astonishing resolve in the last 25 years in fighting poverty, with remarkable progress to show for it. With similar resolve, China can successfully work with the Bank and with other partners to overcome the remaining development challenges it faces today: battling continued poverty, confronting environmental decline, and lowering barriers to global trade. He commented that the upcoming meeting of the G-20 presents a vital opportunity for China and the international community to redress the imbalances in the global economy, to create a more stable and equitable world for future generations. It is the first time that China is hosting this meeting of the G-20-and this is appropriate evidence of China's growing role as a major force in the global economy. The decisions at that meeting can make a difference for the world's poor--between a life of deprivation and suffering or a future with dignity and opportunity.
  • Publication
    Africa: Whatever You Thought, Think Again
    (2005-09-08) Wolfowitz, Paul; Fay, Michael; Leautier, Frannie; Gomes, Paulo
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, congratulated the editorial team of National Geographic for the special issue on Africa. National Geographic has played a unique role in broadening the knowledge of the world. The World Bank partnered with National Geographic to produce a full-color wall map to raise awareness of the millennium development goals (MDGs) and to highlight each country's progress. We often hear about an Africa that is ravaged by poverty, disease and conflict. There is another face to Africa, one of hope, ambition, energy, intelligence and achievement. That face is also captured compellingly in this issue. Africa’s future holds rich opportunities. To seize these opportunities, there are many challenges to overcome. Given the enormous scale of this challenge, we need to come to terms with what we can and cannot achieve with the MDGs. The World Bank is working with countries that request help to strengthen legislation and institutions so they can take charge of combating corruption. Africa's transformation will depend on the commitment of the international community and the resolve of Africa's people and leaders. Michael Fay, National Geographic Explorer in Residence, spoke of his travels in Africa and said that there is a very direct relationship in particular in the African continent, but indeed everywhere on earth, between the management of the natural resource base and poverty alleviation, the wellbeing of humanity. Frannie Leautier, of the World Bank Institute, said countries working together can reach solutions that are much better than when they work individually. She noted the need to balance between human life and other life forms, with the forests, animals and so on. Paulo Gomes, of the World Bank Board of Directors, said the issue was very rich in presenting the ecological dimension of the diversity of Africa. The Bank needs to do something in preparing a comprehensive strategy to rebrand Africa in a more positive light. Africa has a formidable reservoir of variety in fauna and flora that can be used for science and the good of the continent. The panel fielded questions on urban ecology, indigenous knowledge, resource management, and governance amid ethnic diversity.