5. Speeches by Paul Wolfowitz (2005-07)

34 items available

Permanent URI for this collection

Paul Wolfowitz served as 10th President of the World Bank Group from 2005 to 2007.

Items in this collection

Now showing 1 - 7 of 7
  • Publication
    Roundtable Discussion on Economic Development, Georgia State, GA, December 11, 2006
    (2006-12-11) Wolfowitz, Paul; Young, Andrew
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, and Ambassador Andrew Young engaged in a roundtable discussion on economic development, moderated by Dean Bahl of Georgia State. Wolfowitz has made Africa the first priority of the Bank. There is really a chance for Africa to turn the corner. It’s going to have to start with the best performers, doing what the so-called Tigers did in East Asia, showing the way for other countries. Young said you can make more money honestly in a growing economy, than you can steal in a dying economy. Wolfowitz gave examples of the turnaround in Africa. Africa needs an environment where foreign investment support and local domestic investment is even more important.
  • Publication
    Why Africa Matters to Americans
    (2006-12-10) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, talked about a new generation of leaders emerging in Africa, who increasingly recognize their responsibility to their people. The landscape across Africa is changing. Conflicts diminish. Small Businesses emerge. We are seeing a new breath of hope infused in all parts of that continent. More and more Africans are saying they can’t live with corruption. Strong U.S. support for foreign aid is particularly important to help address issues important to Americans, issues like government transparency, anti-corruption, and civil society participation. Wolfowitz concluded that it will be up to Africans most of all to bring about the momentous changes needed to conquer poverty. But as Americans we must be able to say that we did everything we could to give them the hand that they need and deserve.
  • Publication
    Parliaments and Poverty in Africa
    (2006-10-17) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, reminded participants that it is important to remember the more than 1 billion people worldwide struggling to survive on less than $1 a day. Fighting the scourge of poverty is at the heart of the World Bank Group’s mission. The burden of debt and the disease of corruption threaten to undermine the efforts to meet the Millennium Development Goals. Many regions of the world have made significant progress to improve living standards and reduce poverty. Sub-Saharan Africa is moving dangerously in the opposite direction. Africa’s richest resource, and its best hope, is its people. But more development financing and debt relief is needed. In the long run, neither aid nor debt relief will help the poor escape poverty without a transparent and accountable government. We are seeing an informed African citizenry demanding change. The World Bank Group is committed to supporting champions of reform in both government and civil society. Partnering with parliaments from donor countries is as important as working with parliaments in recipient countries. To achieve true prosperity for our integrated planet, we must work together to help give the poorest among us the chance to find their way out of poverty.
  • Publication
    Coordinating for Good Governance
    (2006-09-18) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, discussed good governance, policies, and practice that are the means to achieve better development results. He spoke of sound principles of accountability and transparency that not only assure funds that are spent as intended, but also are essential to accelerating economic growth, helping the poor to escape poverty,and achieving the Millennium Development Goals. He highlighted the need to find solutions which are innovative and flexible and which respect the unique constituents and conditions in each country. He concluded by saying that the effort to strengthen and improve governance is a key element in the fight against poverty.
  • Publication
    Foreign Aid: Challenges and Opportunities
    (2006-07-31) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, discussed Africa’s challenge to unleash the energy of the people, and give people the opportunity to improve their lives themselves. He talked about the challenge of corruption. He appreciated Africa for improving policies to make it easier for new businesses to take off and for businesses that are established to expand. Africans are taking a lead in helping their continent turn the corner, and donors are raising the bar for development assistance to try to ensure that every dollar is used to create a healthier, better-educated, more prosperous Africa. Governance is taken seriously, with performance-based aid strengthening anti-corruption efforts.
  • Publication
    Trade: The Missing Link to Opportunity
    (2005-12-07) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, argued that the Doha Round presents an opportunity to rewrite the rules of an unfair trading system that holds back the potential of the poorest people. As important as aid is, as important as debt relief is, the opportunities generated by trade are far more significant. Unless the people of Africa and other poor countries have access to markets to sell their products, they will not escape poverty or be able to give their children a better future. He said, under the current rules, rich countries are allowed to keep barriers highest on the goods produced by poor countries. Wolfowitz emphasized that rich countries pay out a total of 280 billion dollars in subsidies to their farmers each year. But the real damage is done to farmers in poor countries who are denied markets to sell their goods. It is their children who go hungry, who are deprived of clean water, medicines, and the most basic necessities of life.
  • Publication
    Africa: Whatever You Thought, Think Again
    (2005-09-08) Wolfowitz, Paul; Fay, Michael; Leautier, Frannie; Gomes, Paulo
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, congratulated the editorial team of National Geographic for the special issue on Africa. National Geographic has played a unique role in broadening the knowledge of the world. The World Bank partnered with National Geographic to produce a full-color wall map to raise awareness of the millennium development goals (MDGs) and to highlight each country's progress. We often hear about an Africa that is ravaged by poverty, disease and conflict. There is another face to Africa, one of hope, ambition, energy, intelligence and achievement. That face is also captured compellingly in this issue. Africa’s future holds rich opportunities. To seize these opportunities, there are many challenges to overcome. Given the enormous scale of this challenge, we need to come to terms with what we can and cannot achieve with the MDGs. The World Bank is working with countries that request help to strengthen legislation and institutions so they can take charge of combating corruption. Africa's transformation will depend on the commitment of the international community and the resolve of Africa's people and leaders. Michael Fay, National Geographic Explorer in Residence, spoke of his travels in Africa and said that there is a very direct relationship in particular in the African continent, but indeed everywhere on earth, between the management of the natural resource base and poverty alleviation, the wellbeing of humanity. Frannie Leautier, of the World Bank Institute, said countries working together can reach solutions that are much better than when they work individually. She noted the need to balance between human life and other life forms, with the forests, animals and so on. Paulo Gomes, of the World Bank Board of Directors, said the issue was very rich in presenting the ecological dimension of the diversity of Africa. The Bank needs to do something in preparing a comprehensive strategy to rebrand Africa in a more positive light. Africa has a formidable reservoir of variety in fauna and flora that can be used for science and the good of the continent. The panel fielded questions on urban ecology, indigenous knowledge, resource management, and governance amid ethnic diversity.