Person:
Mahler, Daniel Gerszon

Development Data Group, World Bank
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Welfare economics, Inequality, Behavioral science
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Development Data Group, World Bank
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Last updated January 31, 2023
Biography
Daniel Gerszon Mahler is a Young Professional in the Development Data Group, where he is part of the Sustainable Development Statistics team. Before that, he was with the Poverty and Equity Global Practice, contributing to the practice's global agenda on measuring poverty and inequality. Daniel holds a doctorate in economics from the University of Copenhagen.

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 22
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    The Effect of New PPP Estimates on Global Poverty: A First Look
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2020-05) Atamanov, Aziz ; Lakner, Christoph ; Mahler, Daniel Gerszon ; Tetteh Baah, Samuel Kofi ; Yang, Judy
    This paper provides an initial analysis of the impact on the World Bank's global poverty estimates of the revised 2011 and new 2017 PPPs published in May 2020. The revised 2011 PPPs slightly increase poverty in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, causing the extreme poverty headcount ratio for the world to rise by 0.3 percentage points to 10.3 percent in 2015 (equivalent to 20 million more poor people). The 2017 PPPs have the opposite effect: extreme poverty decreases in Sub-Saharan Africa, reducing the global poverty estimate slightly by 0.6pp to 9.4 percent in 2015 (equivalent to 46 million fewer poor people). The long-run trends in global and regional poverty remain unchanged.
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    April 2022 Update to the Poverty and Inequality Platform (PIP): What's New
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2022-04) Castaneda Aguilar, R. Andres ; Dewina, Reno ; Diaz-Bonilla, Carolina ; Edochie, Ifeanyi N. ; Fujs, Tony H. M. J. ; Jolliffe, Dean ; Lain, Jonathan ; Lakner, Christoph ; Ibarra, Gabriel Lara ; Mahler, Daniel G. ; Meyer, Moritz ; Montes, Jose ; Moreno Herrera, Laura L. ; Mungai, Rose ; Newhouse, David ; Nguyen, Minh C. ; Sanchez Castro, Diana ; Schoch, Marta ; Sousa, Liliana D. ; Tetteh-Baah, Samuel K. ; Uochi, Ikuko ; Viveros Mendoza, Martha C. ; Wu, Haoya ; Yonzan, Nishant ; Yoshida, Nobu
    The April 2022 update to the newly launched Poverty and Inequality Platform (PIP) involves several changes to the data underlying the global poverty estimates. Some welfare aggregates have been changed for improved harmonization, and the CPI, national accounts, and population input data have been updated. This document explains these changes in detail and the reasoning behind them. Moreover, a large number of new country-years have been added, bringing the total number of surveys to more than 2,000. These include new harmonized surveys for countries in West Africa, new imputed poverty estimates for Nigeria, and recent 2020 household survey data for several countries. Global poverty estimates are now reported up to 2018 and earlier years have been revised.
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    Under What Conditions Are Data Valuable for Development?
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-10) Jolliffe, Dean ; Mahler, Daniel Gerszon ; Veerappan, Malarvizhi ; Kilic, Talip ; Wollburg, Philip
    Data produced by the public sector can have transformational impacts on development outcomes through better targeting of resources, improved service delivery, cost savings in policy implementation, increased accountability, and more. Around the world, the amount of data produced by the public sector is increasing at a rapid pace, yet their transformational impacts have not been realized fully. Why has the full value of these data not been realized yet This paper outlines 12 conditions needed for the production and use of public sector data to generate value for development and presents case studies substantiating these conditions. The conditions are that data need to have adequate spatial and temporal coverage (are complete, frequent, and timely), are of high quality (are accurate, comparable, and granular), are easy to use (are accessible, understandable, and interoperable), and are safe to use (are impartial, confidential, and appropriate).
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    September 2019 PovcalNet Update: What's New
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2019-09) Atamanov, Aziz ; Castaneda Aguilar, R. Andres ; Diaz-Bonilla, Carolina ; Jolliffe, Dean ; Lakner, Christoph ; Mahler, Daniel Gerszon ; Montes, Jose ; Moreno Herrera, Laura Liliana ; Newhouse, David ; Nguyen, Minh C. ; Prydz, Espen Beer ; Sangraula, Prem ; Tandon, Sharad Alan ; Yang, Judy
    The September 2019 global poverty update from the World Bank includes revised survey data which lead to minor changes in the most recent global poverty estimates. The update includes revisions to 18 surveys from four countries. As a result of the revised data, the estimate of the global 1.90 US Dollars headcount ratio for 2015 increases slightly from 9.94 percent to 9.98 percent, whereas the number of poor increases from 731.0 million to 734.5 million people.
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    March 2021 PovcalNet Update: What’s New
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-03) Arayavechkit, Tanida ; Atamanov, Aziz ; Barreto Herrera, Karen Y. ; Belghith, Nadia Belhaj Hassine ; Castaneda Aguilar, R. Andres ; Fujs, Tony H.M.J. ; Dewina, Reno ; Diaz-Bonilla, Carolina ; Edochie, Ifeanyi N. ; Jolliffe, Dean ; Lakner, Christoph ; Mahler, Daniel ; Montes, Jose ; Moreno Herrera, Laura L. ; Mungai, Rose ; Newhouse, David ; Nguyen, Minh C. ; Sanchez Castro, Diana M. ; Schoch, Marta ; Sharma, Dhiraj ; Simler, Kenneth ; Swinkels, Rob ; Takamatsu, Shinya ; Uochi, Ikuko ; Viveros Mendoza, Martha C. ; Yonzan, Nishant ; Yoshida, Nobuo ; Wu, Haoyu
    The March 2021 update to PovcalNet involves several changes to the data underlying the global poverty estimates. Some welfare aggregates have been changed for improved harmonization, and the CPI, national accounts, and population input data have been updated. This document explains these changes in detail and the reasoning behind them. In addition to the changes listed here, a large number of new country-years have been added, resulting in a total number of surveys of more than 1,900. Moreover, this update includes important revisions to the historical survey data and for the first time, poverty estimates based on imputed consumption data.
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    Death and Destitution: The Global Distribution of Welfare Losses from the COVID-19 Pandemic
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-05) Ferreira, Francisco H. G. ; Sterck, Olivier ; Mahler, Daniel ; Decerf, Benoit
    The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about massive declines in well-being around the world. This paper seeks to quantify and compare two important components of those losses—increased mortality and higher poverty—using years of human life as a common metric. The paper estimates that almost 20 million life-years were lost to COVID-19 by December 2020. Over the same period and by the most conservative definition, more than 120 million additional years were spent in poverty because of the pandemic. The mortality burden, whether estimated in lives or years of life lost, increases sharply with gross domestic product per capita. By contrast, the poverty burden declines with per capita national income when a constant absolute poverty line is used, or is uncorrelated with national income when a more relative approach is taken to poverty lines. In both cases, the poverty burden of the pandemic, relative to the mortality burden, is much higher for poor countries. The distribution of aggregate welfare losses—combining mortality and poverty and expressed in terms of life-years —depends on the choice of poverty line(s) and the relative weights placed on mortality and poverty. With a constant absolute poverty line and a relatively low welfare weight on mortality, poorer countries are found to bear a greater welfare loss from the pandemic. When poverty lines are set differently for poor, middle-income, and high-income countries and/or a greater welfare weight is placed on mortality, upper-middle-income and rich countries suffer the most.
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    March 2020 PovcalNet Update: What's New
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2020-03) Atamanov, Aziz ; Castaneda Aguilar, R. Andres ; Fujs, Tony H.M.J. ; Dewina, Reno ; Diaz-Bonilla, Carolina ; Mahler, Daniel Gerszon ; Jolliffe, Dean ; Lakner, Christoph ; Matytsin, Mikhail ; Montes, Jose ; Moreno Herrera, Laura L. ; Mungai, Rose ; Newhouse, David ; Nguyen, Minh C. ; Parada Gomez Urquiza, Francisco J. ; Silwal, Ani Rudra ; Sanchez Castro, Diana M. ; Schoch, Marta ; Vargas Mogollon, David L. ; Viveros Mendoza, Martha C. ; Yang, Judy ; Yoshida, Nobuo ; Wu, Haoyu
    The March 2020 update to PovcalNet involves several changes to the data underlying the global poverty estimates. Some welfare aggregates have been changed for improved harmonization, and some of the CPI, national accounts, and population input data have been revised. This document explains these changes in detail and the reasoning behind them. In addition to the changes listed here, a large number of new country-years have been added, bringing the total number of surveys to more than 1,900.
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    Fragility and Conflict: On the Front Lines of the Fight against Poverty
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2020-02-27) Corral, Paul ; Irwin, Alexander ; Krishnan, Nandini ; Mahler, Daniel Gerszon ; Vishwanath, Tara
    Fragility and conflict pose a critical threat to the global goal of ending extreme poverty. Between 1990 and 2015, successful development strategies reduced the proportion of the world’s people living in extreme poverty from 36 to 10 percent. But in many fragile and conflict-affected situations (FCS), poverty is stagnating or getting worse. The number of people living in proximity to conflict has nearly doubled worldwide since 2007. In the Middle East and North Africa, one in five people now lives in such conditions. The number of forcibly displaced persons worldwide has also more than doubled in the same period, exceeding 70 million in 2017. If current trends continue, by the end of 2020, the number of extremely poor people living in economies affected by fragility and conflict will exceed the number of poor people in all other settings combined. This book shows why addressing fragility and conflict is vital for poverty goals and charts directions for action. It presents new estimates of welfare in FCS, filling gaps in previous knowledge, and analyzes the multidimensional nature of poverty in these settings. It shows that data deprivation in FCS has prevented an accurate global picture of fragility, poverty, and their interactions, and it explains how innovative new measurement strategies are tackling these challenges. The book discusses the long-term consequences of conflict and introduces a data-driven classification of countries by fragility profile, showing opportunities for tailored policy interventions and the need for monitoring multiple markers of fragility. The book strengthens understanding of what poverty reduction in FCS will require and what it can achieve.
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    The Impact of COVID-19 on Global Inequality and Poverty
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2022-10) Mahler, Daniel Gerszon ; Yonzan, Nishant ; Lakner, Christoph
    The COVID-19 pandemic has had catastrophic economic and human consequences worldwide. This paper tries to quantify the consequences of the pandemic on global inequality and poverty in 2020. Since face-to-face household survey data collection largely came to a halt during the pandemic, a combination of data sources is used to estimate the impacts on poverty and inequality. This includes actual household survey data, where available, high-frequency phone surveys, and country-level estimates from the literature on the impact of the pandemic on poverty and inequality. The results suggest that the world in 2020 witnessed the largest increase to global inequality and poverty since at least 1990. This paper estimates that COVID-19 increased the global Gini index by 0.7 point and global extreme poverty (using a poverty line of $2.15 per day) by 90 million people compared to counterfactual without the pandemic. These findings are primarily driven by country-level shocks to average incomes and an increase in inequality between countries. Changes to inequality within countries were mixed and relatively modest.
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    Intergenerational Mobility around the World
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-06) van der Weide, Roy ; Lakner, Christoph ; Mahler, Daniel Gerszon ; Narayan, Ambar ; Ramasubbaiah, Rakesh
    Using individual data from over 400 surveys, this paper compiles a global database of intergenerational mobility in education for 153 countries covering 97 percent of the world’s population. For 87 percent of the world’s population, it provides trends in intergenerational mobility for individuals born between 1950 to 1989. The findings show that absolute mobility in education—the share of respondents that obtains higher levels of education than their parents—is higher in the developed world despite the higher levels of parental educational attainment. Relative mobility—measuring the degree of independence between parent and child years of schooling—is also found to be greater in the developed world. Together, these findings point to severe challenges in intergenerational mobility in the poorest parts of the world. Beyond national income levels, the paper explores the correlation between intergenerational mobility and a variety of country characteristics. Countries with higher rates of mobility have (i) higher tax revenues and rates of government expenditures, especially on education; (ii) better child health indicators (less stunting and lower infant mortality); (iii) higher school quality (more teachers per pupil and fewer school dropouts); and (iv) less residential segregation.